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80451331632019-12-052019-12-05BY-SABranislavÍslenskaC2-1911Ílag í tungumálakennslutest0
6456363662018-01-25BY-SASBPEnglishC2 386826:52A 40 year plan for energy0
824314511982020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 631233:094Ailig Mac a' Phì (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Alec recalls his childhood in Nunton, Benbecula, and wartime schooling in Balivanich and then Torlum, including pranks in the playground, classroom, or garden, as well as crofting chores at home, and later with the peats. Leaving school at 14, he started his first paid job in the building trade at 16. He also recalls wartime memories of many different nationalities associated with the airport and POWs, including Australians, Poles, Germans and Italians. He talks also of the end-of-war celebrations and memories of the “Whisky Galore” SS Politician. He then spent some time in Glasgow. Alec lives on Benbecula, and has three sons - Donald, Angus, and John - eight grandchildren, and one great grandchild.0
82441271342020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 558528:044Ailig Mac a' Phì (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Alec relates how he came back to the croft and then got work with a services company which took him and several friends out to St Kilda. He later got work with the Water Board, with whom he stayed until retirement. He also talks about recreational activities, including badminton and football, as well as dances and New Year customs and associated drinking practices. He describes how he met his wife, Margaret, and the details of their wedding, and tells a story of a commando who turned up in the Steadings. Discussion of army-community relations leads to reflection on the changes he’s seen in island life. Alec lives on Benbecula, and has three sons, eight grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.0
82391279372020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 703032:084Alasdair MacAsgaillPart of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, Ali, from Ormacleit in South Uist talks about his working life, both with a large local employer and as a jobbing crofter, as well as some of the traditional practices and customs associated with the latter, and how they are changing.0
824515291062020-02-052020-10-13BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 486720:554Alasdair MacDhòmhnaill (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Alasdair MacDonald (Alasdair Crois Mòraig) from North Uist talks about his life-time commitment to crofting, which his son is now continuing. His first schooling was in Carinish, with his fondest memory being of getting out into the garden, followed by Bayhead, and one year in Inverness, which he didn’t like. On returning to Uist he has worked his croft full-time ever since. He recalls the house-visiting customs of earlier times. His wife, Annie, is from Broughty Ferry, but Alasdair would find it difficult to live somewhere else if it wasn’t by the sea. He’s seen many changes since the time crofters would work with horses, and he explains fertilising and storage practices using seaweed and potatoes.0
8246121482020-02-052020-10-13BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 527623:364Alasdair MacDhòmhnaill (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Alasdair remarks on developments since the 60s, such as the advent of tractors for horses, the Baleshare causeway, local government reorganisation, and European Union development funds. He also talks about a visit to New Zealand and the evident Gaelic influence in its recent history. The discussion shifts to discussion of changes in the Uist physical environment. Shipwrecks are also talked about and the cargo they might yield. Alasdair explains the history of the name Crois Mòraig, and talks about the strength of Gaelic in the community, and reflects on the rhythm of the seasons experienced through crofting.1
755526452019-06-252019-06-28BY-SAAdusPolskiC2 223Analiza SWOT Sztucznej Inteligencji0
935599492021-05-092021-05-09BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 411920:454Anna NicAonghais (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Anna MacInnes, from Callanish on Lewis, talks to Maggie Smith firstly about her family connections to the Breasclete community and school, where Gaelic Medium Education was pioneered. The Callanish Stones attracted tourists, but she remembers the cèilidh culture amongst the locals, including many "characters". Her career to date has been varied, from Gaelic teaching to working at sea, but she remains attached to a crofting lifestyle, still keeping cattle. Currently at home with a baby, she comes from a musical family, and plays box and pipes. With fewer people now working their crofts she's noticed a change in the appearance of the township.0
935650622021-05-092021-05-09BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 390119:354Anna NicAonghais (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Anna and Maggie talk about changes in local culture. Noting that change and development are natural, Anne regrets the loss of local distinctiveness in Gaelic speech. The musical culture is strong. The link with the language should be upheld. There have been various sources of employment, including offshore as well as at the hospital or with the council, plus the nearby pharmaceuticals factory and the community-owned visitor centre. Visitors have included royalty. The community hall offers a local focus. She remembers some of her grandmother's special words, and reflects on the value of having relations all around. It's important to value what's past, including local songs, as life goes on.0
82471304912020-02-052020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 756137:524Aonghas MacPhàil (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Angus MacPhail, from Carinish in North Uist, reveals his Boreray ancestry, and talks about his schooling in both North and South Uist before finishing in Inverness, with impressions of hostel life and being regarded as a “teuchter” in the town. Studying Civil Engineering in Aberdeen, he shared lodgings with other islanders, and was involved in inter-university competitions in shinty and through the pipe-band. Work took him to Inverawe first, followed by London (where he met his Irish wife), and then back to Scotland. Always keeping in touch with fellow Gaels, when they moved to Loch Broom they got involved with An Comunn Gàidhealach, and he also volunteered with the Mountain Rescue team.0
82481191152020-02-052020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 680834:104Aonghas MacPhàil (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Angus talks about their life for 7 years around Applecross and the north-west, with his wife being a district nurse and also doing B&B, in an area where there was still some Gaelic spoken. They then moved back to Uist (via Lewis) when Comhairle nan Eilean Siar was formed. This was a busy time with lots of civil engineering work on roads and new developments. He talks about the development of the strong local Gaelic drama group, and plans for the local history society. Other interests include boating, and his garden – though this was mainly his wife’s work. He discusses the changes he’s seen in Carinish, and his international links through family in Australia and Ireland.0
6274273552018-01-112020-07-21BY-SAfredEnglishC2 6603Art made of stormsArtist Nathalie Miebach takes weather data from massive storms and turns it into complex sculptures that embody the forces of nature and time. These sculptures then become musical scores for a string quartet to play.0
777825262019-09-232020-01-09BY-SApaoliniItalianoC2 11015Atomi (LSSEV)0
447620751172016-07-292016-08-05BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 23815:353Birlinn Chlann Raghnaill: Alan and Bill at KildonanAlan Riach and Bill Innes gave a unique bilingual rendition of the famous poem by Alasdair Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair at Kildonan Museum in South Uist. Alan presented extracts from his new English version, which were interspersed with Gaelic readings from the original by Bill. The video clip shows the final part of their performance. Only the Gaelic sections are transcribed here.0
39421061122012-06-252014-04-19BY-SAmpeEnglishC2 291217:23birth of computerHistorian George Dyson tells stories from the birth of the modern computer -- from its 17th-century origins to the hilarious notebooks of some early computer engineers. A historian and philosopher of science, George Dyson takes a clear-eyed and deeply researched view of our recent scientific past -- while showing where it may lead us. Full bio »0
13841348752013-09-212013-09-21BY-SAcaoimhinsmoKernewekC2 515 4:152Bleujen Dekka an Corawys, gans Nicholas Williams0
421159232012-08-222019-11-20BY-SAKentEnglishC2 107710:22Boaz Almog “levitates” a superconductorHow can a super-thin 3-inch disk levitate something 70,000 times its own weight? In a riveting demonstration, Boaz Almog shows how a phenomenon known as quantum locking allows a superconductor disk to float over a magnetic rail -- completely frictionlessly and with zero energy loss. Experiment: Prof. Guy Deutscher, Mishael Azoulay, Boaz Almog, of the High Tc Superconductivity Group, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University. Boaz Almog uses quantum physics to levitate and trap objects in midair. Call it "quantum levitation.0
755628322019-06-252019-06-28BY-SAmurzynkaPolskiC2 596Bogurodzica-piesn, ktora rozbrzmiewala pod Grunwaldem.0
6755621142018-05-042018-05-04BY-SATadeusz67PolskiC2 2654Bryły w życiu codziennym0
93311396242021-04-222021-04-22BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 568125:404Calum Alasdair FriseilCalum Alasdair Fraser, from Tolastadh a’ Chaolais, talks to Maggie Smith about his family connections and upbringing on the west side of Lewis. In his childhood he spent a lot of time outdoors. Though still young himself, he remembers the sound of weaving from many houses that is no longer heard. After leaving school he tried various jobs in different locations. Now he works on Gaelic issues with An Lanntair in Stornoway. He talks about how he values the Gaelic language and its close connection to where he lives, even though it wasn’t his home language growing up. He also talks about his musical activities, and his interest in maintaining local interest in Gaelic, relating it to a changed way of life that still has close connections to previous generations.0
8732912020-08-242020-08-24BY-NC-NDCalcatrapolaLombardC2 182 3:43CANZON : SCIOR E SPIETAD - CANZON DEL LISSANDER BRASCACanzon d'amor de un om qe a l'è stait fors lassad de la morosa0
87311522020-08-242020-08-24BY-NC-NDCalcatrapolaLombardC2 566 4:34CANZON : TRENTA PIÒ - CANZON DEL DELLINO FARMER & PIERGIORGIO CINELLIUna canzon rap qe la denoncia l'avanzament del ciment.0
15313614472013-12-092013-12-16BY-SAcrisnavarroEspañolC2 207 2:202Carnavales de CádizChirigota ganadora de 2013 en el concurso de comparsas del Carnaval de Cádiz.0
823314383132020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 599227:084Catrìona Nic an t-Saoir (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Catrìona, from Iochdar in South Uist, recalls happy schooldays, first in Iochdar, then Daliburgh, and finishing in Fort William on the mainland. Having decided on a teaching career she trained in Glasgow, before returning to South Uist for her first job, in Lochboisdale, where she used her Gaelic quite a lot. On marrying she moved back to Fort William where she worked in a school for twenty years, while remarking on the close island and Gaelic connections of many in the town and the school.0
82351286622020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 642330:124Catrìona Nic an t-Saoir (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute, with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Catrìona talks about her seminal involvement in the development of Gaelic Medium Education in Lochaber and neighbouring areas, together with the growth of the Fèis movement at the same time. She enjoyed her peripatetic lifestyle. On retiring home to South Uist, she was involved in supply teaching, and has become closely involved with Ceòlas, the summer school and associated activities, and been involved in teaching Gaelic to adults, for example, for Sabhal Mòr Ostaig.0
950455552021-07-202021-07-21BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 659936:154Christine NicLeòidChristine MacLeod from Bragar in Lewis talks to Maggie Smith. She remembers growing up in a crofting community where weaving and fishing were commonplace. Gaelic was widely spoken in the local primary school. After secondary education in Stornoway, she moved to Edinburgh, to study and then teach, first in English, and then in the Gaelic school at Tollcross. She has happy memories of this, until she retired and returned to Lewis. She speaks with particular conviction on the value of storytelling in education. She talks of Bragar today, including the use of Gaelic, placenames, the new use for the old school, and the style of speech. She’s pleased her own Edinburgh-raised children think of it as home. Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques.0
843415545612020-03-122020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 510422:344Christine Primrose (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Christine Primrose first recalls her early childhood in Carloway, Lewis – a close community in which every house had a loom. She started school very young, but always remembers singing – whether to neighbours in their homes, or at community concerts when still a young girl. She talks about the pressure of performance and how to look after your voice. Choral singing is also discussed. Her early career through school, college, and work in Glasgow was marked by singing, culminating with the prize for “seann nòs” (a term which she questions) at the Mòd.1
843512911092020-03-122020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 662630:264Christine Primrose (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Christine talks about touring Ireland and the novel experience of presenting her songs outside her community, emphasising the importance of feeling to maintain authenticity. She is disciplined in her approach, while also bringing her own interpretation to a song. Care for the rhythm of the words enhances the story. Moving to Sabhal Mòr Ostaig enabled her to maintain her singing career, while helping to promote the Gaelic college. She enjoys teaching, and listening to singers from other traditions. She stresses the importance of giving young performers time to learn their craft before pressurising them to perform. Return visits to Carloway underline for her the importance of acknowledging change.1
945256112021-07-062021-07-12BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGaeilgeC2 485924:253Clíona Ní Ghallachóir (1)Clíona Ní Ghallachóir from Meenaclady talks to Colm Mac Giolla Easpaig from Gweedore. Clíona is a twenty-one-year-old student who is currently residing in Galway. In this first part of the interview, Clíona speaks about the student experience during the Covid 19 pandemic. She talks about her hometown and her views on the state of the Irish language in the Gaeltacht. She goes on to talk about her interest in singing and storytelling with some mention of local traditions and customs. Part of the Taisce Bheo na nGael project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques.0
94533422021-07-062021-07-12BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGaeilgeC2 557624:253Clíona Ní Ghallachóir (1) - annotatedClíona Ní Ghallachóir from Meenaclady talks to Colm Mac Giolla Easpaig from Gweedore. Clíona is a twenty-one-year-old student who is currently residing in Galway. In this first part of the interview, Clíona speaks about the student experience during the Covid 19 pandemic. She talks about her hometown and her views on the state of the Irish language in the Gaeltacht. She goes on to talk about her interest in singing and storytelling with some mention of local traditions and customs. Part of the Taisce Bheo na nGael project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques.0
94544052021-07-082021-07-12BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGaeilgeC2 494724:073Clíona Ní Ghallachóir (2)Clíona Ní Ghallachóir from Meenaclady speaks to Colm Mac Giolla Easpaig from Gweedore. Clíona is a twenty-one-year-old student who is currently residing in Galway. In this the second part of this interview, Clíona talks about the changes occurring in the Irish language communities and her own work experience with both translation and language planning. She goes on to speak about her childhood memories and other interests she would like to pursue. She then speaks about her involvement in drama both onstage and behind the scenes. She discusses the importance of faith in her local area before finally talking about what she would do if she were to win the lottery. Part of the Taisce Bheo na nGael project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques.0
94551922021-07-082021-07-12BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGaeilgeC2 592524:073Clíona Ní Ghallachóir (2) - annotatedClíona Ní Ghallachóir from Meenaclady speaks to Colm Mac Giolla Easpaig from Gweedore. Clíona is a twenty-one-year-old student who is currently residing in Galway. In this the second part of this interview, Clíona talks about the changes occurring in the Irish language communities and her own work experience with both translation and language planning. She goes on to speak about her childhood memories and other interests she would like to pursue. She then speaks about her involvement in drama both onstage and behind the scenes. She discusses the importance of faith in her local area before finally talking about what she would do if she were to win the lottery. Part of the Taisce Bheo na nGael project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques.0
5378719122017-04-24BY-SADOMENECEnglishC2 336919:511COMPUTING A THEORY OF ALL KNOWLEDGEStephen Wolfram takes on the grand project of computing a general Theory of All Knowledge, an overarching epistemic structure which would subsume all sciences and fields of practical and cognitive endeavour known or that could be known.0
1160898202013-05-162013-05-16BY-SAfredEnglishC2 1026David Pogue: 10 top time-saving tech tipsTech columnist David Pogue shares 10 simple, clever tips for computer, web, smartphone and camera users. And yes, you may know a few of these already -- but there's probably at least one you don't.0
684266002018-06-072018-06-07BY-SANicolePDeutschC2 3572Der Gummibärchen-Taucher0
675037672018-05-032018-05-04BY-SAlauramariaDeutschC2 214Der Uhrturm / Sehenswürdigkeiten von Graz0
674791912018-05-032018-06-07BY-SAKristl_ADeutschC2 3992Die Bundesländer Österreichs0
660951212018-03-222018-04-12BY-SALiHo1511DeutschC2 2873Die Tiere am Bauernhof0
82491278632020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 377429:544Dòmhnall MacDhòmhnaill (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Donald MacDonald, from Baleshare, North Uist, recalls his schooling and first job. Going to primary school in Baleshare he found he made faster progress with a Gaelic-speaking teacher. Illness interrupted his education at Bayhead, before he spent 5 years in Inverness, where he encountered some hostility as a “teuchter”, and experienced a distancing from his family. A happier memory was of salmon poaching in Lewis on his way home, where he started work in a bank before being transferred to Glasgow.0
8250121132020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 445235:564Dòmhnall MacDhòmhnaill (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Donald recalls giving up his job in Glasgow, and then poignantly describes how his father saw him off at the quay in Lochmaddy as he set off on his travels round Europe. He recounts various adventures with various travelling companions, before arriving in Turkey. Troubles at the time between Turkey and Greece over Cyprus caused difficulties with the post.0
8251123062020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 525835:434Dòmhnall MacDhòmhnaill (3)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the third part, Donald describes his adventures crossing to the West Bank from Syria to spend time in a kibbutz. He was then called home in light of his father’s serious illness, which meant that Donald had take over responsibility for the croftwork. Working several crofts together he made a living for a while selling cattle and beef, with partners in Elgin and customers in Ardnamurchan. While his father was alive they would also host Gaelic learners. Following a mini-stroke he no longer keeps cattle, but a neighbour continues to use his land.0
762817164082019-07-302020-02-05BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 518126:384Eairdsidh CaimbeulAn early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. This film was made in an initial training session. As part of their training Pàdruig quizzes Archie on his recollections and opinions on growing up and continuing to live on Benbecula. Archie is a native of Benbecula, and the conversation starts with him explaining his family roots. He goes on to talk about his schooling and higher education on the islands and later on the mainland. The conversation moves on to his history of employment, with spells in Gaelic playgroup development and then in advice work back on Benbecula. Pàdruig then asks Archie about changes he’s witnessed in the locality and the language since the days of his youth.1
684338142018-06-07BYJanaSchmidtDeutschC2 420Ei verschwindet in der Flasche0
87441402020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 1157EL PROFETA - Crimen e Castig 0
87421302020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 527EL PROFETA - Crompar e Vender0
8737802020-08-242020-11-09BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 905EL PROFETA - El Dar0
87401022020-08-242020-11-09BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 943EL PROFETA - El lavorar0
8736902020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 468EL PROFETA - El MatrimoniEL PROFETA - El Matrimoni0
87431402020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 880EL PROFETA - I Cà0
87351902020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 486EL PROFETA - I FiœiEL PROFETA - I fiœi0
8741902020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 446EL PROFETA - I Pagn0
87341512020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 813EL PROFETA - L'AmorEL PROFETA - Capitol L'Amor0
87331332020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 1694EL PROFETA - L'Ariv de la navEl Khalil Gibran (6 de Jenar, 1883 – 10 d’Avril, 1931) l’è stait un pitor, poeta, filosof e scritor libanes qe l’ha passad asquas tuta la so vita int i Staits Unids d’Amerega. El Profeta, publegad per la prima vœlta int el 1923, l’è el so lavor plussee conossud, e l’è stait voltad in plussee de quaranta lengue. Per via de la popolaritaa de El Profeta, el Gibran l’è vun dei poeta plussee lejuds a’l mond dop dal Shakespeare e el Lao-Tzu.0
87391622020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 538EL PROFETA - La Legria e la Pena0
87451002020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 709EL PROFETA - La Lej0
87381002020-08-242020-08-24BY-SACalcatrapolaLombardC2 567EL PROFETA - Maiar e Bever0
88321502020-09-192020-09-19BY-NC-NDCalcatrapolaLombardC2 711:03FRANCO CERRI intervistaInterview to Franco Cerri famous jazz musician.0
661060402018-03-222018-04-17BY-SAElisabeth96DeutschC2 303Frühblüher0
4581262672016-11-02BY-SAjose2700DanskC2 3451Gavner stillelæsning skolen0
824013611412020-02-052020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 707330:414Gina NicDhòmhnaill (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Gina MacDonald from Claddach Baleshare in North Uist remembers her early schooldays, and a childhood in the Westford Inn. She talks about the prevalence of Gaelic and the difference in English skills between the generations. She completed her schooling in Inverness, and worked in Glasgow for a while before returning to Uist to work in a bank. Then, after retiring from that work, she returned to education to do a BA in Art, and she discusses some of the challenges entailed.0
82411246262020-02-052020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 624429:294Gina NicDhòmhnaill (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Gina first shows Archie some of her work from her art course, discussing local environmental and cultural influences and their interaction with memory processes. This leads on to discussing local storytelling experiences. Gina further explains how the family croft has developed, with the associated self-catering accommodation business for returning visitors, and expresses an interest in continuing to work with the active local history society.0
674855802018-05-032018-05-06BYKarina SchafferDeutschC2 32322Haustiere0
6145233172017-11-11BY-SAluciacolladoEnglishC2 273918:54How to escape education's death valleySir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.0
791515838352019-11-072020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 491722:594Hughena NicDhòmhnaill (1)An early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first of two parts, Hughena talks about her family background and her happy memories of growing up and going to various schools in Uist and Benbecula, including her experience of coming across computers for the first time when Sgoil Lìonacleit opened. This was followed by a spell in Stornoway where she studied at the college and did part-time work, including with Radio nan Gàidheal. On returning to Uist she worked in various places, and raised a family. She describes how she enjoys working with people, and how she likes to relax afterwards.0
79161260402019-11-072020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 479921:504Hughena NicDhòmhnaill (2)An early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers. Here, in the second of two parts, discussion of the importance of Hughena’s faith to her leads onto broader reminiscence over customs and traditions in the days of her childhood, when casual visits to and from neighbours would be more frequent, often related to crofting matters. Hughena describes early memories of collecting and eating shellfish from the shore, and of baking skills less often put to use these days now that so much is so easily available in the shops. The conversation finishes with some discussion of the strength of Gaelic use in her family, how she’s passed it on successfully to her children, and the value of now encouraging older community members to share their spoken skills, while acknowledging the challenges involved in recording them.0
84321305602020-03-122020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 471521:234Iain Greumach (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Iain Graham talks about his family background and his earliest memories of life in Back, on Lewis, where he grew up in a close-knit community. He describes his early education in the local school and how that was followed up by a spell at the Nicolson Institute in Stornoway. He also talks about the typical occupations in the community at the time, where many people were involved in weaving, and about Hallowe’en practices. He continued his education in Aberdeen, before being recruited to Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, the Gaelic college on Skye.0
84331180202020-03-122020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 448022:174Iain Greumach (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Iain recalls initially what Sabhal Mòr Ostaig was like when he first joined. He has seen many developments, not just in the estate, but also in the range of courses that have been developed over time. While the first students tended to come from the islands, the student body has changed, with greater geographical mixing and of ages. Course delivery methods have also become more flexible. Iain is closely involved with organising work experience for students, and is pleased that college graduates find good employment. Finally, he reflects on both change and continuity as he experiences it on frequent return visits to Lewis.0
7738222142019-09-182020-01-09BY-SAmartastellaItalianoC2 80636Il Doping (LSSEV)0
1169953162013-05-272013-05-27BY-SAfredEnglishC2 869 5:58Juan Enriquez: Your online life, permanent as a tattooWhat if Andy Warhol had it wrong, and instead of being famous for 15 minutes, we’re only anonymous for that long? In this short talk, Juan Enriquez looks at the surprisingly permanent effects of digital sharing on our personal privacy. He shares insight from the ancient Greeks to help us deal with our new “digital tattoos.”0
10481286222013-03-05BY-SAcleliacilibertoItalianoC2 1686La superstizione nell'antica RomaLa storia della superstizione in Italia e in altre parti del mondo.0
11591233442013-05-162013-09-17BY-SAfred中文C2 1432 7:47Liu Bolin: The invisible manCan a person disappear in plain sight? That’s the question Liu Bolin‘s remarkable work seems to ask. The Beijing-based artist is sometimes called “The Invisible Man” because in nearly all his art, Bolin is front and center — and completely unseen. He aims to draw attention to social and political issues by dissolving into the background.0
86631352622020-07-012020-07-03BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGaelgC2 617 2:0311LLG-1-01 Dys Robin Briw0
86528792020-06-242020-07-03BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGaelgC2 785 4:0811LLG-1-04 Keesh son kied dy varroo ushagyn0
8658891442020-07-012020-07-02BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGaelgC2 706 4:1211LLG-1-06 Pleadeilys 20
86671101402020-07-132020-07-16BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGaelgC2 477 2:4911LLG-1-08 Coyrle da Manninee0
8697802732020-07-292021-01-23BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGaelgC2 1947 8:0711LLG-1-12 Vanninee ghooghyssagh0
932511511062021-04-182021-04-19BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGaelgC2 1562 9:3711LLG-1-14 Ny Methodee0
934819011422021-05-032021-05-20BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGaelgC2 242111LLG-1-17 Screeuyn veih Juan Thomase Mac y Chleree0
9169155462021-02-112021-02-11BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 497525:194Magaidh Smith (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Maggie Smith, from Achmore on Lewis, talks about early childhood memories and stories of Glasgow where she was born, though she has Achmore roots going back many generations. Returning home she recalls the kind of upbringing island children of her age received, in which community links and mutual responsibilities were strong. Grandparental stories from work experience in Patagonia, and snatches of Spanish at the fank guarded against cultural introversion. She recalls her schooling, and the impact of television’s arrival on cèilidh culture, with traditional work on the land noticeably falling off in the 80s, particularly after oil work began.0
9170124182021-02-112021-02-11BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 385719:184Maggie Smith (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part Maggie and Peter talk about trends in island work patterns over the years. The advent of the Arnish yard led to skills development opportunities for men across Lewis, which many later put to use in openings around the world. Weaving was a traditional occupation, frequently practised in combination with other jobs. Even as a schoolchild Maggie was accustomed to fitting her schoolwork into other duties, such as fetching water for the house. After a short spell working in Inverness after school she returned to work with the family haulage firm for many years, before branching out into media work, tourism and other projects.0
9171132472021-02-112021-02-11BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 5879334Maggie Smith (3)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the third part Maggie talks more about her cultural activity in the community, including community drama based on locally sourced stories, and the collection of local poetry. Moving to Zoom during lockdown has created a new platform for locals to share stories and for incomers and Gaelic learners to learn about the culture, recreating old communities and gathering new people. She also talks about the power of music and song in working with older people at risk of memory loss, and of collecting fishermen’s stories, mostly in Gaelic. The conversation ends with a discussion of changes that have come over Achmore and the use of Gaelic in the community.1
684435312018-06-072018-06-07BY-SAKahDeutschC2 344Magnetismus _ was ist anziehend, was nicht ?Durchführen des Experimentes (Magnetismus) - Welche Gegenstände sind Magnetisch?0
825213011032020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 551524:184Màiri Robasdan (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Mary Robertson from Benbecula, talks about her family and her memories of her early schooldays in Torlum. Her father was a gamekeeper for the South Uist estate. Leaving at 15 to get further training at Duncraig Castle was a shock. She describes the daily routine there. After that she worked in Edinburgh for two years before moving to Fort William to do hotel work, where she found more of an island community.0
82531275272020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 604626:474Màiri Robasdan (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Mary describes returning to Benbecula after her husband’s death, and the changes she noticed, particularly with the increased army presence and the work available through public schemes. She found work in the newly opened Sgoil Lìonacleit, where she continued till retirement. She is also involved with various charities and community groups, and her church involvement has entailed trips abroad to various countries. Her Gaelic interest also took her to Canada. She still dances and enjoys walking in various parts of the Highlands.0
7998309752019-11-212019-11-22BY-SACÓDGaeilgeC2 502123:33Muiriseachaí An Spidéil - Agallamh leis an stairí Seán Ó NeachtainSan agallamh seo, labhraíonn Seán Bán Breathnach ó RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta le Seán Ó Neachtain Cathaoirleach Chumann Seanchais agus Staire Chois Fharraige faoi na Muiriseachaí, clann a bhí ina dtiarnaí talún sa Spidéal agus a bhfuil baint ag a sliocht leis an gceantar i gcónaí. In this interview Seán Bán Breathnach from RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta speaks to Seán Ó Neachtain, chair of Cumann Seanchais agus Staire Chois Fharraige about the Morris family who were landlords in the Spiddal area and whose descendants still have links to the area.0
17701093452014-03-182014-03-18BY-SAtg20cm14DeutschC2 772 5:06Münster - wwwreisesehnsuchttv0
784713792019-10-112019-10-11BY-SAshinueEnglishC2 22112National sports in English speaking countries0
451428178372016-10-112019-03-19BY-NC-NDGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 666852:254Norman Maclean on Friday: GàidhligOn the last day, Norman is invited to turn his thoughts specifically to Gaelic and its place in people’s hearts and minds, and to Gaelic development efforts. Acknowledging the challenges the language faces in today’s world, he reflects on the complex interplay and relationships between Gaelic and English, and on various ways in which bilingualism can be viewed. In emphasising its benefits he counsels against the dangers of a monolingual “English ghetto”, colourfully invoking his own observations on the nomination campaign for the American presidential election. In contemplating bi-directional bilingualism he discusses the challenges of, and offers his own advice on, the learning of Gaelic and, in particular, the place of literacy. Finally, he relates the language issue back to the culture from which it springs, sharing personal thoughts on how his sense of belonging reinforces his sense of identity, and emphasising his own willingness and commitment to pass on his knowledge to others.0
4510288312372016-10-112016-11-11BY-NC-NDGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 489638:334Norman Maclean on Monday: Sinnsireachd“Every Gael knows who he is.” Norman talks about his genealogy, on both sides of the family, and how these family networks played an important part in his early upbringing in Glasgow, Lochaber, and Benbecula. He has clear memories of his paternal grandfather teaching him songs, a man who himself won a prize for Gaelic singing at the Falkirk Tryst of 1878. His maternal grandmother, meanwhile, migrated to Glasgow from North Uist and never learned to speak English, functioning socially just within the Gaelic-speaking community of Glasgow of that time. Norman reflects on how community relations were experienced from different perspectives in his childhood.0
451323015432016-10-112016-11-11BY-NC-NDGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 566844:214Norman Maclean on Thursday: CruthachalachdNorman is invited to discuss his personal creativity as a teacher, writer, poet, musician, and comedian. He reflects on the varied influences of others, from backstreet singers to Billy Connolly, and discusses figures and trends in various art forms, and offers his opinions. He also recites a recently composed example of his own poetry, and other verses that have impressed him. In discussing how his bilingual background contributed to shaping his material, he also reflects on how commentators’ propensity to place performers in pigeonholing categories could result in narrow or distorting descriptions of his work, for example as a “Gaelic comedian”.0
451123259672016-10-112016-11-11BY-NC-NDGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 467435:134Norman Maclean on Tuesday: FoghlamAfter offering some further thoughts on the dominant Catholic-Protestant divide in the Glasgow of his youth, Norman goes on to trace his educational journey, with customary vivid detail and illustrative anecdote, through primary schools in Lochaber, Benbecula and Glasgow, and on to Belahouston Academy and Glasgow University. He discusses the constraints on, and the opportunities for, varied language choices he and others made in these contexts, within and outwith home and school environments, reflecting also on the Gàidheal-Gall relationship in Glasgow, and some of the wider educational choices he made at that time.0
451223815752016-10-112016-11-11BY-NC-NDGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 696853:484Norman Maclean on Wednesday: CoimhearsnachdanNorman describes and reflects upon changes he has witnessed in Gaelic community life over the years, both in Glasgow and in the Hebrides, highlighting some paradoxes and tensions. In former times geographical horizons may have been much closer in comparison with the global awareness modern connectivity enables, yet the latter may not lead to a sense of greater connectedness. He discusses how, while the Gaelic community in Glasgow may have tended to envisage itself in a higher or somewhat exclusive position in relation to other Glaswegians, there was nonetheless a strongly felt imperative to acquire their language. Conversely, while young Gaels might be envied by their peers in some ways, they did not feel their language was respected by non-speakers, with apparent racial imprecations sometimes experienced. Lastly, in discussing how broadly the term “Gàidhealach” might be applied, he depicts in more detail the links and fissures between Glasgow communities of Irish and Scottish Island/Highland extraction.0
423724192012-08-222012-08-22BY-SAelenavSvenskaC2 2421Om SpråkbankenAn introduction to the Swedish Language Bank as a rese<arch and development unit at Gothenburg University.0
6616471482018-03-222018-03-23BY-SAbec123DeutschC2 363Österreich0
768916889292019-09-032020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 480326:354Pàdruig MoireachAn early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. This film was made in an initial training session. As part of their training Archie quizzes Pàdruig on his lifestory. Pàdruig establishes his family roots in Carloway, Lewis, and talks about his early memories of home and community life there as a child. He goes on to describe his progress through school on Lewis and higher education in Aberdeen, leading to work on the North Sea rigs. This was followed by a career change into language teaching which him took him abroad before returning to Scotland and involvement in teaching Gaelic to adults. The conversation concludes with a discussion of some of the pleasures and challenges entailed in this area of work.0
2367947572014-11-112014-11-11BY-NC-NDfredEnglishC2 187410:002Plant cellsHank describes why plants are so freaking amazing - discussing their evolution, and how their cells are both similar to & different from animal cells.1
4703465182017-01-27BY-SAWjkEnglishC2 320Race TrailerTrailer0
904040102020-11-242020-11-24BY-SAmaster dla中文C2 41Rap 《凛冬将至》0
651258962018-02-212018-03-09BY-NC-NDelicotteroEnglishC2 1140222RENEWABLE ENERGY TANCREDI0
8421250242020-03-102020-04-17BY-SAcecilia.cutroneItalianoC2 105933Risorse umane e amministrazione del personale (LSSEV)1
433945232012-08-222019-11-20BY-SAgrisezvEnglishC2 3006Rob Legato: The art of creating aweRob Legato creates movie effects so good they (sometimes) trump the real thing. In this warm and funny talk, he shares his vision for enhancing reality on-screen in movies like Apollo 13, Titanic and Hugo. Rob Legato creates surprising and creative visual illusions for movies.0
420110982012-08-222012-08-22BY-SASakeEnglishC2 29961Rob Legato: The art of creating awe; TED lectureTED Lecture, used for training purposes Rob Legato creates movie effects so good they (sometimes) trump the real thing. In this warm and funny talk, he shares his vision for enhancing reality on-screen in movies like Apollo 13, Titanic and Hugo. Rob Legato creates surprising and creative visual illusions for movies0
663644202018-04-032018-04-10BY-SArulesforlifeNederlandsC2 401Romantiek 5( de wereld dichtbij; Crystal palace, Eiffel toren)0
665534142018-04-102021-02-11BY-SArulesforlifeNederlandsC2 167Romantiek 6 Impressionisme0
755025412019-06-252019-06-28BY-SABasiaPolskiC2 707Różnorodność Podlasia0
82361245192020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 688026:074Seonag Smith (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Seonag Smith from Hàclait talks about her early years in Benbecula, including schooling in Daliburgh and Iochdar. She recalls family life as the eldest child, including helping on the croft, boat trips, and social practices associated with peatcutting, such as family division of labour and attention to the needs of elderly neighbours. She also talks about army-community relations once she started working at the “camp” after leaving school.0
82371164592020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 762731:324Seonag Smith (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Seonag talks about the social scene in Benbecula when she was young, and how she met her husband. She also talks about her work on St Kilda, and her impressions of that island. Army life took them to Germany, and she mentions how she felt knowing Gaelic helped her learn German. This was followed by spells in Catterick, and London, where she had the chance to observe a different world at close hand. Eventually they returned to Benbecula to a newly built house.0
82381147172020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 854534:374Seonag Smith (3)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the third part, Seonag talks about her pastimes, such as reading, and her regular appearances on Gaelic radio and TV (and the prizes she’s won) and reflects on current Gaelic employment opportunities. She also recalls her parent’s stories of older feasting traditions attendant on weddings and sales days. Acknowledging the facilities now available at the 6-year school, and through online services, she regrets the lack of job opportunities for young people. Returning to cooking, the conversation ends with a discussion of traditional seafoods.0
838813961382020-02-272020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 606129:594Seònaid Mhoireach (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Jessie Murray, originally from Shawbost, Lewis, talks to her son Peter about their family history, and how his grandparents actually met and married around the time of the Depression in Detroit, where there was a strong Gaelic community. She tells stories of jumping ship, and working conditions and how they differed in America. On returning to Lewis they raised a family on the croft, and Jessie talks of her earliest memories of life on the land, herding the cows and getting home-made butter and cheese, and the food she got at school before they opened a canteen.0
838911661172020-02-272020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 667133:344Seònaid Mhoireach (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Jessie recalls her schooling and the weak Gaelic component to it, though the language was strong in the playground and the community. Communion practices are also recalled, as well as the role of supernatural tales, and New Year and Hallowe’en customs in a culture where house visits were common. After leaving school at 16 and some work experience Jessie settled on training for nursing, which took her to Glasgow. Plans to move to Canada were abandoned when she met Peter’s father, and they returned to Lewis, first to Carloway, then Stornoway. Now living in Inverness, she offers thoughts on changes she’s seen in Lewis and the lack of opportunities. She prefers to remember home as it was.0
43488482012-08-222019-11-20BY-SAsfilararenSvenskaC2 779 5:28Spåra sjukdomar med hjälp av tandstenFöreställ dig vad vi skulle kunna lära oss om sjukdomar genom att studera historien av mänskliga sjukdomar, från forntida hominider ända till nu. Men hur? TED Fellow Christina Warinner är en arkeologisk genetiker, och hon har hittat ett spektakulärt nytt verktyg - mikrobiskt DNA i fossiliserad tandsten. Christina Warinner is a researcher at the University of Zurich, where she studies how humans have co-evolved with environments, diets and disease0
755422132019-06-252019-06-28BY-SAgrazynaPolskiC2 309Szkielet czlowieka.0
751210412019-06-18BY-SALinkdelesEnglishC2 322:551Technique critique - emergency room and operating room scenes from a variety of television showsAnnie Onishi, general surgery resident at Columbia University, takes a look at emergency room and operating room scenes from a variety of television shows and movies and breaks down how accurate they really are. Would the adrenaline scene from Pulp Fiction actually play out that way? Is all that medical jargon we hear in shows like Grey's Anatomy and House true-to-life? Is removing a bullet really a cure-all for a gunshot wound?0
1057115832013-03-072020-03-19BY-SAfredDanskC2 25512Test af kabelanlæg0
14461111142013-10-092014-06-25BY-SAHellelykkeالعربيةC2 189 1:20The attitudes that sparked Arab Springabout....0
4475479132016-07-292016-08-05BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanEnglishC2 313 3:193The Birlinn of Clanranald: Alan Riach at Loch EynortBefore his evening recital at Kildonan Museum, South Uist, Alan visited Loch Eynort, from which the birlinn sailed, with some friends, and read some short extracts from his English version of the famous poem by Alasdair Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair.0
2432864782012-02-092014-04-19BY-SAfredEnglishC2 881 6:281The world's biggest Jacob's Ladder!2
785315422462019-10-122020-05-25BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 458829:544Tòmas MacDhòmhnaill (1)An early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first of two parts, Tommy Macdonald talks to Archie Campbell about his life in South Uist. Tommy talks about his family antecedents and also about his employment history, starting with helping in his father’s mobile shop, followed by a long spell with a fish farm company during which time he developed his computing skills and interests. This was followed by a diversification into a number of different paths, including providing local information on visiting bus tours. Local genealogical research led him to an interesting discovery about his own family history.0
78541193322019-10-122020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 501732:104Tòmas MacDhòmhnaill (2)An early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part Tommy talks about his involvement with various local cultural groups in South Uist, such as Ceòlas, Fèir Tir a’ Mhurain, and the Accordion and Fiddle club. He and Archie also discuss some of the challenges and opportunities of working with and in Gaelic in the community today in and between the various generations. The modern disappearance of the “taigh ceilidh” stimulates the recollection and brief retelling of some of the stories that would be told in earlier times.0
769724742019-09-132019-09-13BY-SADandrianPolskiC2 70821Topologia (Daniel Piekarczyk, Adrian Mysiński i Wojtek Kawa)0
6146188212017-11-12BY-SAluciacolladoEnglishC2 1316 7:53Tour the solar system from homeWant to navigate the solar system without having to buy a spacecraft? Jon Nguyen demos NASA JPL's "Eyes on the Solar System" -- free-to-use software for exploring the planets, moons, asteroids, and spacecraft that rotate around our sun in real-time. Jon Nguyen is an award winning aeronautics and graphics engineer at NASA.0
6281192202018-01-182018-01-18BY-SAKULESHOVEnglishC2 3204Unit 10
675139502018-05-032018-05-17BY-SAAnnaAlexandraDeutschC2 250Unsere fünf Sinne0
754918902019-06-252019-06-28BY-SABasia 123PolskiC2 399Wedrowki po Polsce0
848777162012-11-012012-11-01BY-SAClaisneachdEnglishC2 3763Whale SongPeter Kerr is a resident of Berneray in the Outer Hebrides. His blog showcases his poetry, prose, and pictures. Here he gives "a reading of a piece reflecting upon a recent experience…"0
137812213492013-09-132013-09-13BY-SAKentAndersenEnglishC2 351420:26Why do we sleep?Russell Foster is a circadian neuroscientist: He studies the sleep cycles of the brain. And he asks: What do we know about sleep? Not a lot, it turns out, for something we do with one-third of our lives. In this talk, Foster shares three popular theories about why we sleep, busts some myths about how much sleep we need at different ages -- and hints at some bold new uses of sleep as a predictor of mental health.0
720819692018-11-142018-11-14BY-SAAntonioMacau粵語C2 32李白《将进酒》0
778115882019-09-232019-09-23BY-SAMr.VirusPolskiC2+19034Lekcja CLIL (Dawid Hebda)0
922733132021-02-252021-03-01BY-SAfredLatineC2+3433Lorem Ipsum0
669243522018-04-192018-04-19BYJULDeutschC2+153Österreich0
154724842362013-12-142013-12-15BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligC2+214 6:32Salm 122, na h-earrainn 6-9, Dòmhnall MacLeòidSalm 122, na h-earrainn 6-9. Dòmhnall MacLeòid (Port Rìgh agus Sgalpaigh)0

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