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Media
Unit Views Clicks Created Changed Licence Owner Language Level Words Media Time Buttons Files Title Summary Likes
738459526622012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 256 2:053Agallamh: Sorcha NicAonghaisChildren's Parliament activities and examples. Member of the Uist and Barra Children’s Parliament Sarah Macinnes describes how it meets, and some of its activities. She also recites a jointly composed poem, produced in the course of those activities.0
203826613172014-02-042014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligA2 256 2:052Agallamh: Sorcha NicAonghais (tro Teachertube)Children's Parliament activities and examples. Member of the Uist and Barra Children’s Parliament Sarah Macinnes describes how it meets, and some of its activities. She also recites a jointly composed poem, produced in the course of those activities.0
718329315932012-09-102013-10-17BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 465 6:193Bi BeòMedia Studies. Kevin De Las Casas and James McLetchie, both resident in North Uist, write and perform songs with their group “Bi Beò”. The documentary follows the song creation process from initial ideas round a kitchen table through musical arrangement to studio recording.0
724341136572012-09-102013-07-06BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 491 6:243Buain na MònadhCutting peats. Benbecula resident Archie Campbell cuts peats in the traditional manner with the help of his neighbour Donald Innes. Various stages in the process are shown, as well as the use of the traditional peatknife.0
711338821032012-09-102013-12-04BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 609 6:483Ceòlas - Sgoil-shamhraidhThe Ceòlas music summer school is held annually in South Uist. It aims to integrate traditional music and dance in a community setting. It has strong links with tutors from Cape Breton in Canada, where old styles of Scottish fiddling and stepdancing have been maintained. The school attracts students from around the world.1
709308117742012-09-102017-03-15BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 783 7:022Còcaireachd-Blas UibhistFood preparation, and local specialities. The “Blas Uibhist” night was put on by the Ceòlas community group in South Uist to celebrate local food as well as music. Local food producers offered tastings of their products, and a well-known hotelier gave a cookery demonstration. The evening finished with live local music. The event was held in Gaelic, with simultaneous translation into English.0
701298418752012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 349 6:003Creag ÀrdCare for adults with special needs. This is a short documentary about the Craigard Day Centre in Lochmaddy, North Uist. It’s a centre for people with disabilities, run by the Social Services Department of Comhairle nan Eilean Siar, the Western Isles Council.0
721289514622012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 599 7:023Croitearachd is BuainCrofting and Harvesting Documentary. Roddy Macdonald’s croft at Aird in Benbecula is the location for this documentary which looks first at silage production, and then in more detail at the more traditional practice for harvesting corn, including the construction of stacks. These are welcomed by conservation bodies.1
727280410682012-09-102014-09-14BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 401 5:193FeannaganConstructing raised (or "lazy" beds for potato cultivation. This short documentary, filmed in South Uist, illustrates the steps involved in building lazy beds. Angus Macdonald, on a Life Skills course run by the Cothrom training group, passes on his traditional skills to other participants. Some other activities of the group are also shown.0
746287910762012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 454 5:313Foghlam Fad Beatha agus Sabhal Mòr OstaigGàidhlig tertiary education. Sabhal Mòr Ostaig is Scotland’s Gaelic college. This short film gives a brief tour of the main campus in the Isle of Skye, outlining some of the main facilities and functions of the college.0
20462317672014-05-182014-05-20BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligA2 454 5:313Foghlam Fad Beatha agus Sabhal Mòr Ostaig (tro TeacherTube)Gàidhlig tertiary education. Sabhal Mòr Ostaig is Scotland’s Gaelic college. This short film gives a brief tour of the main campus in the Isle of Skye, outlining some of the main facilities and functions of the college.0
749273711562012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 456 5:493Latha nam BàtaicheanFamily day out. The Grimsay Boat Day is an annual community event in May. This film covers some of the major activities at a typical Boat Day, including exhibitions, sales and stalls, boat trips and demonstrations, and evening entertainment.0
20492297782014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligA2 456 5:493Latha nam Bàtaichean (tro TeacherTube)Family day out. The Grimsay Boat Day is an annual community event in May. This film covers some of the major activities at a typical Boat Day, including exhibitions, sales and stalls, boat trips and demonstrations, and evening entertainment.0
73025889292012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 348 4:593MuirsgeinCatching razorfish. This is a short documentary about how to catch razorfish in South Uist. Alec Beaton demonstrates his technique, and shows others on a Life Skills course how to do it.0
72025781872012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 159 5:043Òran:Seumas MacIllÈidichCommunity heritage and change. The song “Na seann daoine” was created by James McLetchie and Kevin De Las Casas for performance by their group “Bi Beò”. This is a “first cut” recording made in Benbecula.0
737279112382012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 452 5:063Pàrlamaid na Cloinne ann am BarraighYouth work and creativity. Members of the Uist and Barra Children’s Parliament gather with friends and family to clean up a beach. Later in the day they begin work on a piece of communal art in which each MCP invests items of personal significance.0
203723141062014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligA2 452 5:063Pàrlamaid na Cloinne ann am Barraigh (tro TeacherTube)Youth work and creativity. Members of the Uist and Barra Children’s Parliament gather with friends and family to clean up a beach. Later in the day they begin work on a piece of communal art in which each MCP invests items of personal significance.0
74029233772012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 398 7:103Pàrlamaid na Cloinne ann am Beinn na FaoghlaYouth work and creativity. At their year-end meeting Members of the Uist and Barra Children’s Parliament reflect on all the work they have done during the course of their involvement, collect awards, and stage a dramatic performance to show the local community what they have learnt, and what they think is important.0
204022611412014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligA2 398 7:103Pàrlamaid na Cloinne ann am Beinn na Faoghla (tro TeacherTube)Youth work and creativity. At their year-end meeting Members of the Uist and Barra Children’s Parliament reflect on all the work they have done during the course of their involvement, collect awards, and stage a dramatic performance to show the local community what they have learnt, and what they think is important.0
70426636372012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 242 5:033Pròiseact Re-StoreFurniture restoration and recycling. The Re-Store Project is a social enterprise in South Uist. Old furniture is restored and recycled. The project also houses a book recycling scheme, and provides employment and training opportunities in the local community.0
161122731322014-02-022014-09-10BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligA2 472325Ro fhad’ air fairg’ an EadarlìnA poem1
92971432021-03-222021-03-22BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligA2 15Seo deuchainn0
15062323532013-11-122017-04-24BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 211 3:396Sgath SgitheanachBi Beò sing in praise of the qualities, skills, and sheer stamina of their neighbours in the island "next-door"...0
74325374422012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 821 7:373Sgilean obrach aig Sgoil LìonacleitSecondary school crofting and boatbuilding courses. S3 and S4 pupils at Sgoil Lìonacleit have the option of taking vocational courses in crofting or boatbuilding, among other subjects. This film shows crofting pupils involved in both croft-based and class-based work, and boatbuilding pupils constructing oars in the workshop.0
20432471582014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligA2 821 7:373Sgilean obrach aig Sgoil Lìonacleit (tro TeacherTube)Secondary school crofting and boatbuilding courses. S3 and S4 pupils at Sgoil Lìonacleit have the option of taking vocational courses in crofting or boatbuilding, among other subjects. This film shows crofting pupils involved in both croft-based and class-based work, and boatbuilding pupils constructing oars in the workshop.0
73325608172012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 319 5:282SurfadhSurfing. This documentary follows North Uist resident Will Lamb, originally from Baltimore, as he goes surfing with friends. Preparatory steps are shown, as well as examples of successful and unsuccessful rides.0
73522854702012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 399 5:052Surfadh leis a’ ghaoithWindsurfing. North Uist resident Angus Johnson demonstrates his windsurfing skills at West Beach in Sollas. The conditions are good for beginners, with a strong wind but a calm sea.0
71524476112012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 512 7:203Taigh ChearsabhaghMuseum and art centre, Tourism. Taigh Chearsabhagh is a key attraction for both visitors and local people in North Uist. It has an important development and educational role in the visual arts, as well as in conserving and displaying aspects of local culture and history.0
70723975402012-09-102013-11-26BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2 547 4:322Taigh ToitidhFish Processing. The Hebridean Smokehouse on North Uist processes salmon and other foodstuffs for a global market. This documentary illustrates the preparation and packaging of the product.0
75123563032012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligA2+285 2:053Agallamh: Pàdruig MoireasdanBoat Day activities. Pàdruig Morrison talks about his involvement in the Boat Day, highlighting favourite activities and past successes. He also talks about his family connection to Heisgeir.0
20512015202014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligA2+285 2:053Agallamh: Pàdruig Moireasdan (tro TeacherTube)Boat Day activities. Pàdruig Morrison talks about his involvement in the Boat Day, highlighting favourite activities and past successes. He also talks about his family connection to Heisgeir.0
111223724982013-04-162013-10-24BY-SAfredGàidhligB1-355 5:281A’ cur uèirichean ri plugaLearn how to wire a standard British plug. The unit demonstrates the step by step actions needed when wiring a fused British plug.0
161922261602014-02-132017-04-24BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1 185 5:035’S tu mo ghaolA romantic song0
74825122162012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1 606 4:003Agallamh: Alex Gruba, Kathleen Reddy, Mìcheal SpeirsWorking and studying at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig. Alex Gruba from Poland, Kathleen Reddy from Canada, and Mìcheal Speirs from Perthshire, give their impressions of what it is like to study and/or work at Scotland’s Gaelic College, including discussion of the relative merits of onsite and distance learning.0
204822142942014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 606 4:003Agallamh: Alex Gruba, Kathleen Reddy, Mìcheal Speirs (tro TeacherTube)Working and studying at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig. Alex Gruba from Poland, Kathleen Reddy from Canada, and Mìcheal Speirs from Perthshire, give their impressions of what it is like to study and/or work at Scotland’s Gaelic College, including discussion of the relative merits of onsite and distance learning.0
73627022242012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1 766 4:142Agallamh: Aonghas MacIainWindsurfing and other outdoor sports. Angus Johnson talks about the best places for windsurfing in North Uist, and why he prefers West Beach. He also talks about other sports he plays, including kitesurfing. He then talks in some detail about the equipment you need for the sport and how much it might cost.0
70225241532012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1 244 1:333Agallamh: Dòmhnall MacFhionghuinCare for adults with special needs. Donald is a client at Craigard Day Centre. Here he talks about his activities at Craigard. He also talks about the pictures he’s exhibiting at the Taigh Chearsabhagh art centre. He goes on to say what else he does during the week, mentioning the names (NAAFI, Lovats) of another workplace, and his musical activities at the weekend.0
74523391192012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1 498 2:533Agallamh: Dunnchadh MacDhòmhnaill agus Dòmhnall MacÌosaigBoatbuilding skills. Boatbuilding pupils Duncan Macdonald and Donald MacIsaac talk about their school careers to date, and explain how the boatbuilding course works, and how they think what they have learnt may help them in the future.0
2045227352014-05-182014-05-20BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 498 2:533Agallamh: Dunnchadh MacDhòmhnaill agus Dòmhnall MacÌosaig (tro TeacherTube)Boatbuilding skills. Boatbuilding pupils Duncan Macdonald and Donald MacIsaac talk about their school careers to date, and explain how the boatbuilding course works, and how they think what they have learnt may help them in the future.0
73225174742012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1 868 4:233Agallamh: Màiri Anna NicAoidhPreparing seafood and other island foods. Mary Anne Mackay talks about how she cooks locally found seafood, including razorfish. She also talks about older traditions of food preparation and preservation from her childhood memories.0
75825141762012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1 417 4:023Agallamh: Margarita NicUilleimThe importance of place in artistic development, and exhibition facilities. Harris artist Margarita Williams talks about her own artistic career and development, and the importance of her own sense of place. She also talks about the facility which Seallam! offers to local artists for exhibitions and workshops.0
72923682052012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1 432 3:583Agallamh: Tommy DòmhnallachBenefits of lazybeds. Tommy Macdonald, life skills co-ordinator at Cothrom, talks about why they dug lazybeds at the centre, and the benefits they bring. He also mentions a bio-diversity scheme that affects the site.0
334024642392015-11-242015-11-25BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 222513:592An Coigreach, le Iain Mac a' Ghobhainn0
317429016282015-09-172015-09-17BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 72710:502An Duine Dubh0
260723034772015-02-282015-03-01BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 588 5:17Bacadh air a’ ghaoith agus sàbhaladh airgidMar a ghabhas draught-excluder a dhèanamh gu furasta air cosgas ìseal le Duck Tape.0
317722346432015-09-252015-09-25BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 181611:261Bùrn, le Iain Mac a' Ghobhainn0
319120431162015-10-202015-10-20BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 9841Dìth-cuimhne, le Iain C. Mac a’ Ghobhainn0
10372428482013-02-202013-04-20BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 476 3:491Do Aonghus an TàilleirLachaidh Mhoireasdan talks to Gordon Wells and sings a song which his father wrote.0
324824301142015-11-042015-11-25BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 631 4:184Na Bleideagan, le Dòmhnall Iain MacÌomhair0
44952204752016-09-082016-09-08BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 615 7:162Oighrig Keogh - Comunn Gàidhlig ThorontoOighrig Keogh, a thogadh ann am Beinn nam Faoghla, ag innse mar a thàinig i gu Canada ann an 1954, agus mun a cuid obrach le Comunn Gàidhlig Thoronto.0
583516341002017-07-052021-01-15BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 183 1:4511Òran Bròn na Glùine0
210722901342014-06-022014-06-02BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 136 5:231Runrig: Chi Mi'n Geamhradh0
17752167892014-03-192014-06-02BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1 107 2:33Seasaidh Lexy: In Bed with Aonghas Pàdraig 10
118824311522013-07-04BY-SAfredGàidhligB1 1138 9:43Student introduction to Clilstore in Scottish Gaelic0
72223401732012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+818 4:443Agallamh: Ruairidh DòmhnallachThe crofting year. Roddy “Red Tie” Macdonald summarises the crofting year, listing the different activities that are undertaken in different seasons. He talks in more detail about his traditional method of harvesting corn, and how it helps conservation bodies.0
522397102011-10-082013-04-20BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1+355 5:28A’ cur uèirichean ri pluga0
7312370802012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+744 4:173Agallamh: Ailig PeutonCatching razorfish. Alec Beaton describes his razorfishing technique, including precautions on how to protect your fingers and not get lost.0
7282224652012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+395 2:233Agallamh: Aonghas DòmhnallachLazybed construction. Angus Macdonald talks about the construction and the use of lazybeds. He also mentions the traditional “foot plough” tool that was used to build them.0
7552062602012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+625 3:303Agallamh: Catrìona ScottDigitisation process and material content. Catriona Scott, digitiser for the Tobar an Dualchais project, describes the various stages of the technical process in which she’s involved. She also reveals some of the contents of the tapes that have local relevance and with which she has a close personal connection.0
7662077132012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+493 3:253Agallamh: Ciorstaidh NicIllFhinneinPowerdown Project officer job description. Powerdown officer Kirsty MacLennan lists the different responsibilities she has in her post, including working with schools and community groups on carbon emission reduction projects, and gives examples of individual projects in which she is involved.0
76221391122012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+833 4:073Agallamh: Dòmhnall DòmhnallachVisualisation Wall project. Donald MacDonald talks about his own specialist interest and his particular project within Greenspace. He also talks about what it is like to do work of this kind in Stornoway.0
72523091262012-09-102014-09-03BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+1158 6:103Agallamh: Eairdsidh Caimbeul (Buain)How to cut peats. Archie Campbell goes through the various stages entailed in cutting peats and storing them.0
7722203602012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+870 4:583Agallamh: Eairdsidh MacAoidhOperation of a community newspaper and related initiatives. Archie Mackay, editor of Am Pàipear, describes the basic functions of the paper in the community and outlines the business model on which it operates. He goes on to describe some new initiatives which broaden the service it offers beyond its monthly print run.0
7702062422012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+628 4:383Agallamh: Iain BuchananBusiness impact on the community. Uig community member Iain Buchanan talks about the impact Seatrek has had locally over the course of its history to date, describes current levels of marine activity, and looks forward to ambitious plans for the future.0
7392210582012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+1177 6:223Agallamh: Iseabail NicAonghaisChildren's Parliament activities and impacts. Isabell Macinnes, mother of MCP Sarah Macinnes, offers a parental perspective on the activities of the Uist and Barra Children’s Parliament, describing how she thinks they have benefited her daughter.0
20392403462014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1+1177 6:223Agallamh: Iseabail NicAonghais (tro TeacherTube)Children's Parliament activities and impacts. Isabell Macinnes, mother of MCP Sarah Macinnes, offers a parental perspective on the activities of the Uist and Barra Children’s Parliament, describing how she thinks they have benefited her daughter.0
75223621132012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+1041 7:493Agallamh: Lachaidh Moireasdan (Cuimhneachan Heisgeir)Youthful memories of Heisgeir. Lachie Morrison talks about a remarkable episode in his life when his own father took the family to live on the Monach Isles (Heisgeir) off the west coast of North Uist.0
20522245162014-05-182014-05-20BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1+1041 7:493Agallamh: Lachaidh Moireasdan (Cuimhneachan Heisgeir) (tro TeacherTube)Youthful memories of Heisgeir. Lachie Morrison talks about a remarkable episode in his life when his own father took the family to live on the Monach Isles (Heisgeir) off the west coast of North Uist.0
75024721592012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+571 4:243Agallamh: Lachaidh Moireasdan (Griomasaigh is Bàtaichean)Maritime connections. Lachie Morrison is a longstanding Grimsay resident. Here he shares some of his early memories of involvement with boats and the sea.0
20501997102014-05-182014-05-20BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1+571 4:243Agallamh: Lachaidh Moireasdan (Griomasaigh is Bàtaichean) (tro TeacherTube)Maritime connections. Lachie Morrison is a longstanding Grimsay resident. Here he shares some of his early memories of involvement with boats and the sea.0
74423701922012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+935 5:073Agallamh: Nìall Mac a’ PhearsainCrofting skills. Benbecula crofter Neil Macpherson relates how and why the crofting course was set up, and describes how the course contents relate to the crofting year.0
20442362112014-05-182014-05-20BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB1+935 5:073Agallamh: Nìall Mac a’ Phearsain (tro TeacherTube)Crofting skills. Benbecula crofter Neil Macpherson relates how and why the crofting course was set up, and describes how the course contents relate to the crofting year.0
7732053512012-09-102018-11-22BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+541 3:303Agallamh: Tormod MacGill-EainWriter Norman Maclean tells Am Pàipear editor Archie Mackay the story of how he returned to live in Uist, referring to his poor health, and relating how he came to find a new home in Daliburgh despite initial misgivings.0
73424003652012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+1020 6:452Agallamh: Uilleam LambSurfing. Will Lamb talks about the best weather conditions for surfing, explaining the significance of different wind directions. He also describes likely conditions at different times of the year. He goes on to talk in more detail about why he likes to go surfing and how it benefits him physically and mentally.0
141132514782013-10-072013-10-07BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB1+1072 8:033Eòin Trumaisgearraidh"Difficult Encounters with Mother Earth" - Iain talks to his old friend and neighbour, Mary Morrison, a retired English teacher and revitalised Gaelic learner. Their conversation covers three generations of family and friends from the acquisition of the croft, through the many changes since, to current practice today, via English-teaching in Spain, the North Uist Highland Games and other highlights.. Iain speaks clearly and precisely and is always keen to encourage Gaelic learners. This is Mary's first Gaelic interview.0
17672266582014-03-182014-03-27BY-SAMissMacKayGàidhligB2-285 2:354Is toigh leam fhìn thu - Sineag Nic an t-Saoir0
8492441332012-11-012012-11-01BY-SAClaisneachdGàidhligB2-1122Puirt-à-beulFollowers of Guthan nan Eilean/Island Voices will recall the recent interview with Will Lamb about the launch of the re-edited version of Kenneth Norman Macdonald’s collection of “Puirt-à-Beul”. As part of his talk at Ceòlas Will invited some singers to give a demonstration. It went down a storm, and luckily for us, Holly Gibb recorded a video clip which is now on YouTube, and which she is happy to share with us. Talk about “Island Voices” – Rona Lightfoot, Kathleen MacInnes, and Sìneag MacIntyre sharing the stage!0
326120721222015-11-112015-11-11BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2-8051Na Solais, le Iain MacDhòmhnaill0
76521882522012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2-919 5:233Agallamh: Agnes Rennie (Eachdraidh is Obair)History and work of the community trust so far. Galson Estate Trust chair Agnes Rennie outlines the background to the formation of the community trust, relates its progress to date, including purchase of the estate, and describes some of the various activities that are already carried out by board members and staff.0
7672026462012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 531 3:143Agallamh: Agnes Rennie (Planaichean is Co-obrachadh)Plans and partnership of the community trust. Galson Estate Trust chair Agnes Rennie talks about future plans, and how the trust works with other groups, particularly linkage with the planned University of the Highlands and Islands through local research group Greenspace, and explains the importance attached to revenue generation through renewable energy.0
70825302252012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 1054 6:072Agallamh: Alasdair MacEachainnFish Processing. Alasdair MacEachen is an Environmental Health Officer in Benbecula. He describes the implications of his job in terms of both enforcement and education, in particular relation to food handling and production.0
72324995502012-09-102014-08-23BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 1341 6:213Agallamh: Anna NicIllfhialainConservation and crofting life. Anne Maclellan describes her duties as Biodiversity Officer for the local council, including interaction with local schools and crofters. She describes in some detail a scheme that assists crofters to harvest corn in a way that helps rare birds, and comments on shared interests between crofters and conservation bodies.0
7162263532012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 328 2:033Agallamh: Caitrìona NicCumhaisHeritage development. Caitriona MacCuish is the Heritage Officer at Taigh Chearsabhagh. She describes what the job entails and what she enjoys about working there.0
74225211532012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 1428 8:083Agallamh: Catriona BlackChildren's Parlament rationale. Teacher Catriona Black offers an educational perspective on the benefits of the Children’s Parliament way of working, and relates how it has helped pupils to develop.0
20422553222014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2 1428 8:083Agallamh: Catriona Black (tro TeacherTube)Children's Parlament rationale. Teacher Catriona Black offers an educational perspective on the benefits of the Children’s Parliament way of working, and relates how it has helped pupils to develop.0
7572363342012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 1289 7:023Agallamh: Chris Lawson (Eachdraidh is Seirbheisean)Development of the genealogy service in Harris and current activities. Centre director Chris Lawson explains the background to how the Seallam! centre came into being. She goes on to describe the various services on offer in addition to genealogy tracing, including book sales, and exhibitions, and gives an indication of the level of interest there is both locally and from visitors, particularly noting linkage to St Kilda.0
2057261332014-02-052014-04-28BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2 1289 7:023Agallamh: Chris Lawson (Eachdraidh is Seirbheisean) (tro Teachertube)Development of the genealogy service in Harris and current activities. Centre director Chris Lawson explains the background to how the Seallam! centre came into being. She goes on to describe the various services on offer in addition to genealogy tracing, including book sales, and exhibitions, and gives an indication of the level of interest there is both locally and from visitors, particularly noting linkage to St Kilda.0
7591928102012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 722 4:153Agallamh: Chris Lawson (Gnìomhachas is Planaichean)Genealogy buisiness planning. Seallam visitor centre director Chris Lawson explains some of the factors behind the centre’s business success, and outlines plans for future development and diversification, including online records, course development, and book writing.0
7172118622012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 352 2:253Agallamh: Dòmhnall FearghasdanValue of museum and art centre. Donald Ferguson speaks as a student on the first year of the BA in Fine Art that is hosted by Taigh Chearsabhagh. He describes and comments on the facilities in the centre and the quality of services and teaching staff on the course.0
7612210502012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 992 4:463Agallamh: Dòmhnall MacRisnidhDeveloping a commercially oriented research capacity for Higher Education. Project manager Donald MacRitchie talks about the various strands of environmental research in which Greenspace is involved and explains the relationship between the unit and the host college.0
7262460742012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 884 5:063Agallamh: Eairdsidh Caimbeul (Cleachdaidhean)Social practices associated with peatcutting. Archie Campbell describes some of the traditional social customs associated with peat cutting and notes how they have changed in recent times. He also speculates on the relevance of using peat for fuel in today’s world.0
70323993832012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 790 4:303Agallamh: Flòraidh DhòmhnallachCare for adults with special needs PLUS Traditional Skills. Flora Macdonald, a North Uist resident, talks first of all about the importance of Craigard in the community, and her own interactions with Donald MacKinnon. She goes on to describe her reasons for setting up the traditional skills exhibition in Taigh Chearsabhagh, and her own thoughts on their place in the community today.0
74724721322012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 1220 6:503Agallamh: Iain Tormod MacLeòidHistory of Sabhal Mòr Ostaig. Depute Principal John Norman Macleod relates significant events in the history of the development of Scotland’s Gaelic College, indicates further development plans, and describes how much he enjoys his work.0
20472367492014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2 1220 6:503Agallamh: Iain Tormod MacLeòid (tro TeacherTube)History of Sabhal Mòr Ostaig. Depute Principal John Norman Macleod relates significant events in the history of the development of Scotland’s Gaelic College, indicates further development plans, and describes how much he enjoys his work.0
71023083652012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 405 2:042Agallamh: Iseabail GrahamFood preparation, and local specialities. Isabel Graham is a well-known hotelier and cook at the Orasay Inn in South Uist. Here she describes how she uses local produce when preparing meals for guests.0
7412372542012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 1026 5:553Agallamh: Iseabail SteeleChildren's Parlament rationale. Health Worker Isabel Steele explains some of the thinking behind the establishment of the Uist and Barra Children’s Parliament and how it was set up, and relates how it has impacted on her work0
20412560342014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2 1026 5:553Agallamh: Iseabail Steele (tro TeacherTube)Children's Parlament rationale. Health Worker Isabel Steele explains some of the thinking behind the establishment of the Uist and Barra Children’s Parliament and how it was set up, and relates how it has impacted on her work0
71223642302012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 827 4:083Agallamh: Màiri NicAonghaisCommunity impact of summer school (Ceòlas). Mary Macinnes is the chairperson of the local committee that organises the summer school each year. She describes the activities of the group through the year and the impact of Ceòlas on the local community.0
71322781932012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 439 2:153Agallamh: Mary Ellen StiùbhartAdministrative procedures for summer school (Ceòlas). Mary Ellen Stewart is the administrator of the summer school. She describes the tasks that need to be done leading up to and during the week.0
7692066152012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 801 4:253Agallamh: Murray MacLeòidRunning a marine trouism business. Seatrek operator Murray Macleod talks about the various services he offers to tourists, and the kind of sights they’re liable to see. He also talks about the various strands to his business, how he values his team, and how he enjoys his job.0
70624131592012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 743 4:303Agallamh: Nìall DòmhnallachFurniture restoration and recycling; voluntary work. Neil Macdonald is a director on the Board of Management of Cothrom, the community group that manages the Re-Store project. He describes the directors’ responsibilities for the work of Cothrom in general, and the importance of a voluntary group such as Cothrom in island community life.0
71421101192012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 410 2:033Agallamh: Ruairidh MacIlleathainEducational impact of summer school (Ceòlas). Ruairidh MacIllEathain is a well-known Gaelic broadcaster with a particular interest in Gaelic learners. He is attending Ceòlas for the first time. He talks about the quality of the instruction in his chosen subjects, and assesses the value of the school for learners of Gaelic.0
7542231572012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 1034 6:553Agallamh: Seòna NicDhòmhnaillDigitisation project national structure and local management. Shona Macdonald, Lochboisdale manager of the Tobar an Dualchais digitisation project explains the main aims of the project and how it is structured nationally, and outlines a diversification strategy for the local centre once the first project is complete.0
70524131112012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 620 4:123Agallamh: Seumas DòmhnallachFurniture restoration and recycling. Seumas Macdonald is the Craftsman/Trainer at the Re-Store project in Bornais, South Uist. He talks about the work and training they do, and the value of the project to the trainees, himself, and the community.0
7192423852012-09-102013-04-18BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 1674 7:343Agallamh: Seumas MacIllÈidichLyric writing and interpretation. James McLetchie talks about what prompted him to write the words to the song “Na seann daoine”. He explains the references to local people and family members, talks about the importance of social customs and the physical environment in Uist, and reflects on how things have changed in his local community.0
77120171462012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 578 7:013Am PàipearThe community newspaper of the Uists. The Am Pàipear community newspaper serves, principally, the Uist communities. The film shows how a story is collected and reproduced, and some of the related initiatives associated with Am Pàipear.0
31652007782015-09-092015-09-09BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2 1424 8:262Aon Fheasgar - le Pòl MacAonghais0
375205362012-06-062012-06-06BY-SAPadruigMGàidhligB2 307Baigh ris a’ Ghàidhlig 0
368223292012-05-302012-05-30BY-SAClaisneachdGàidhligB2 3003Bodach a' Phuill Mhònaidh0
4126193582016-04-222016-04-22BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2 181 4:521Bothan Àirigh am Bràigh Raithneach0
79481106222019-11-142019-12-11BY-SACalumRosach1996GàidhligB2 377018:11CM 1 - Leaving Barra and heading for AustraliaCalum's background, sloinneadh, growing up on Barra, learning English, leaving Barra, sailing, traveling the world (Australia)0
7949108232019-11-142019-12-11BY-SACalumRosach1996GàidhligB2 342217:14CM 2 - New Zealand, Samoa, Fiji, PanamaLeaving Austalia for New Zealand, Samoa, Fiji, Panama & Boston0
7950108502019-11-142019-12-11BY-SACalumRosach1996GàidhligB2 404019:44CM 3 - Meeting Islanders All Over the WorldLondon, meeting Islanders all over the world, back to Barra, working as a salesman, Scotland, working as a fireman on CalMac, humorous stories, Vancouver & the trade unions.0
7951107202019-11-142019-12-11BY-SACalumRosach1996GàidhligB2 391320:00CM 4 - Stories about WorkMore work stories, death of a friend at work, back to Scotland, winning £700 in bets and spending it all, to Ontario, marrying, still working at time of recording as salesman.0
7952108912019-11-142019-12-11BY-SACalumRosach1996GàidhligB2 324116:51CM 5 - Humorous StoriesMacNeil Gathering in Cape Breton, salesman stories, humorous stories, shearing, living in Selkirk ON, Gaelic community in Toronto and Comunn Ghàidhlig Thoronto, in trouble with the law, keeping up the Gaelic.0
113624381432013-04-302020-01-04BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 1331 9:593Cuairt Ghàidhealach: Beinn na Faoghla gu Rann na FeirsteThe Scottish Island Voices Project (Guthan nan Eilean) visits Ireland. This documentary has a Scottish Gaelic commentary. You can also hear some Irish Gaelic conversation with dual language (Irish and Scottish Gaelic) subtitles.0
77524901502012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 940 5:583Dhan Chamara: Gòrdan WellsPlans and aspirations for future collaborative development of Island Voices project. Gordon Wells, Island Voices co-ordinator, talks about hopes for the future development of the project in collaboration with local community groups, including Cothrom and Am Pàipear, noting the strength of bilingualism in the community, and encouraging interested parties to engage with the project.0
20752334492014-05-182014-05-18BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2 940 5:583Dhan Chamara: Gòrdan Wells (tro TeacherTube)Plans and aspirations for future collaborative development of Island Voices project. Gordon Wells, Island Voices co-ordinator, talks about hopes for the future development of the project in collaboration with local community groups, including Cothrom and Am Pàipear, noting the strength of bilingualism in the community, and encouraging interested parties to engage with the project.0
7742082412012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 295 2:043Dhan Chamara: Tormod MacGill-EainLaunching an autobiography. Writer Norman Maclean gives his opinions on the qualities of Am Pàipear, the Uist community newspaper.0
11852678102013-07-032013-10-09BY-SAfredGàidhligB2 180815:38Guided Tour - Authoring in Clilstore in Scottish Gaelic0
262193742012-02-242014-04-19BY-SAClaisneachdGàidhligB2 118462Guthan sa Choimhearsnachd0
3692115132012-05-302012-05-30BY-SAClaisneachdGàidhligB2 4513Òran a' Chogaidh0
76017951942012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 560 5:543Rannsachadh aig GreenspaceMarket-orientated environmental research activity in the Western Isles. The main activities of the Stornoway-based Greenspace Research group are outlined and exemplified.0
26822017202015-03-292015-03-29BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2 95 3:25Salm 79, na h-earrainn 3-40
7562069752012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 495 4:273Seallam!Genealogy centre in Harris. The viewer is introduced to the location of the Seallam! Visitor Centre in Harris, and to the services on offer there for visitors, including exhibitions from external parties, such as the Harris Tapestry.0
44001797312016-05-162019-12-13BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2 290 2:2712Sonas ann an Suidhisnis0
25142007622015-02-132017-04-24BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 226 5:086Sùilean Dubh nan EileanA romantic song0
75322211752012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 597 7:203Tobar an DualchaisDigitisation centre in South Uist. Scottish folk music and the oral tradition are the focus of the Tobar an Dualchais project, which has a centre in Lochboisdale where old recordings in danger of disintegration are converted into digital format and placed online. The skills acquired can be used in new areas.0
14692233172013-10-162017-04-24BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 428 4:536Tug of WarA depiction of the Tug of War competition which traditionally brings the annual North Uist Highland Games to a close.0
76821142002012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 779 8:393Turas Mara gu HiortEnviromental tourism excursion to natural and cultural world heritage site. A brief introduction to St Kilda is given. An excursion with a Lewis-based tourism operator is recorded, including both main islands, covering aspects of both cultural and natural heritage.0
7642300982012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2 552 4:143Urras Oighreachd GhabhsainnCommunity land owership in Lewis. This documentary introduces the geographical area of the Galson Estate, and briefly describes the work of the community trust within the context of the area and its history.0
952440392011-10-292013-04-20BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligB2+423 6:131Test of Tobar an Dualchais 3 - Am Prionnsa, an Sagart agus an t-AmadanThis is a traditional story related by a traditional story teller. (Only the first part of the story has been transcribed so far.)0
7632127332012-09-102013-04-19BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligB2+956 4:593Agallamh: Calum MoireachSemantic Web technology and the built environment. Greenspace researcher Malcolm Murray talks about his work and research interests at Greenspace, including energy supply and demand issues and linkage to Internet-based tools, as well as involvement with European partners. He also discusses the advantages of conducting PhD research in Stornoway.0
332921441792015-11-172015-11-22BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC1 144511:552A' Bhean-Uasal NicÌomhair à Cnoc an t-Soluis air a' BhacA noble Lewis lady, (known - outwith her earshot - as Bean Dhòmhnaill Ailig 'Fat"), undertakes a long journey to Tibet, for a special meeting with a special person... Norman Maclean narrates the gripping Gaelic tale right through to its scarcely predictable conclusion. Part of his Sgeulachdan Thormoid collection.0
442825466822016-06-052016-06-05BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC1 982 7:272Àiridh na h-Aon Oidhche, le Tormod MacGill-EainMaster raconteur Norman Maclean tells the spine-tingling Gaelic tale of Àiridh na h-Aon Oidhche, a local landmark out near Rueval in Benbecula, and reveals how it got its name... He relates the story for Mary Morrison, an enthusiastic community participant in the Island Voices/Guthan nan Eilean project.0
73531494922019-02-182019-04-14BY-SAMagaidhHebGàidhligC1 166712:46An Ceilidhiche0
73521418942019-02-182019-04-15BY-SAMagaidhHebGàidhligC1 642 4:48An t-Seann Fhiadh0
307221603492015-08-202016-10-26BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC1 550 4:092Blàr ChàirinisNorman Maclean tells the story in Gaelic of the Battle of Carinish in 1601 - as if it was yesterday. And, master storyteller that he is, he brings it right up to date with references to current singers who still mine this rich cultural heritage.0
332621074522015-11-172015-11-22BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC1 446 4:062CabhagThe story of Cabhag's canine heroics in an unsettling encounter on a misty mountainside - as told by Norman Maclean in his Sgeulachdan Thormoid collection for Island Voices.0
73551417432019-02-182019-04-14BY-SAMagaidhHebGàidhligC1 160115:24Coinneach Tormod Mo Dhuine0
33282125932015-11-172015-11-22BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC1 549 4:382Dòmhnall Phàdraig agus Màiri Claire40 years married "as happy as two shoes". Màiri Claire knows how to deal with her partner's crisis of confidence... Part of Norman Maclean's collection of "Sgeulachdan Thormoid".0
113724041532013-04-302013-05-07BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC1 841 4:123Eairdsidh agus Nìall CaimbeulBenbecula residents Neil and Archie Campbell reflect on what they've seen and heard during their short stay in Ranafast. Filmed as part of the Scottish Island Voices Project visit.0
73491336692019-02-182019-04-15BY-SAMagaidhHebGàidhligC1 689 5:26Fear Mhealastaidh0
73541447332019-02-182019-04-14BY-SAMagaidhHebGàidhligC1 241721:50Fo Sgaile Shuaineabhail0
79461081172019-11-142019-11-14BY-SACustal1GàidhligC1 48 4:081Griogair 2Nuair a bha sinn ann am Baile a' Chaolais a Tuath, bhruidhinn sinn nas fhaide le Griogair Labhruidh. Seo darna roinn an agallaimh a bh' againn. A' toiseachadh le faclan Iain MacAonghuis air sgrios-cinnidh nan Gàidheal, tha Griogair a' bruidhinn air suidheachadh nan Gàidheal an-diugh.0
332721961352015-11-172015-11-22BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC1 555 5:112HàllainPolitics, Verbosity, Love, and Death. The romantic story of Fionnlagh Phàdruig a' Chnuic and Peigi Iain Bhig, related by Norman Maclean on Island Voices as part of his Sgeulachdan Thormoid collection.0
735014461102019-02-182019-04-15BY-SAMagaidhHebGàidhligC1 538 4:35Is Daor a Cheannaich mi Fiadhachd0
73331387202019-02-132019-04-15BY-SAMagaidhHebGàidhligC1 839 5:00Nighean Dhòmhnaill Bàin an t-Strùim0
230725982952014-10-022021-02-28BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC1 414 3:074Òran do Sgoilearan Chàirinis, le Tormod MacGill-EainNorman Maclean's grandfather was lost at sea during the First World War, when his mother was still young. Here he recites his own composition on the themes of war and loss to the pupils of Carinish School, which his mother attended as a girl.0
73661411422019-02-202019-04-14BY-SAMagaidhHebGàidhligC1 177213:29Os Mo Chionn Sheinn an Uiseag0
15412217422013-12-102017-04-24BY-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC1 202 5:336Ruith leis a' GhaoithA Gaelic interpretation by James McLetchie of Kevin de Las Casas' original song lyric on the themes of exile and the dream of return.0
73511374272019-02-182019-04-15BY-SAMagaidhHebGàidhligC1 904 5:32Sabaid Mhor Wick0
17712614982014-03-182014-06-18BY-SAcoinneachGàidhligC1 214 2:03Sanas 'Gabh an Cothrom 's Thig Gam Theagasg' le Bòrd na GàidhligSanas gus daoine a brosnachadh gu dreuchdan teagaisg ann am foghlam Gàidhlig.0
332520862722015-11-172015-11-22BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC1 411 3:432Sgeulachdan Thormoid: Facal-toisichA few words of introduction from Norman Maclean to a series of Gaelic stories - told in his own inimitable style!0
20792087272014-05-192014-05-19BY-SAmagaidhGàidhligC1 3161Smocadh0
152626652022013-12-072015-01-22BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligC1+870 4:121Gilleasbuig Aotrom - air aithris leis an Sgiobair0
824313691972020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 631233:094Ailig Mac a' Phì (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Alec recalls his childhood in Nunton, Benbecula, and wartime schooling in Balivanich and then Torlum, including pranks in the playground, classroom, or garden, as well as crofting chores at home, and later with the peats. Leaving school at 14, he started his first paid job in the building trade at 16. He also recalls wartime memories of many different nationalities associated with the airport and POWs, including Australians, Poles, Germans and Italians. He talks also of the end-of-war celebrations and memories of the “Whisky Galore” SS Politician. He then spent some time in Glasgow. Alec lives on Benbecula, and has three sons - Donald, Angus, and John - eight grandchildren, and one great grandchild.0
82441218342020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 558528:044Ailig Mac a' Phì (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Alec relates how he came back to the croft and then got work with a services company which took him and several friends out to St Kilda. He later got work with the Water Board, with whom he stayed until retirement. He also talks about recreational activities, including badminton and football, as well as dances and New Year customs and associated drinking practices. He describes how he met his wife, Margaret, and the details of their wedding, and tells a story of a commando who turned up in the Steadings. Discussion of army-community relations leads to reflection on the changes he’s seen in island life. Alec lives on Benbecula, and has three sons, eight grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.0
82391211312020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 703032:084Alasdair MacAsgaillPart of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, Ali, from Ormacleit in South Uist talks about his working life, both with a large local employer and as a jobbing crofter, as well as some of the traditional practices and customs associated with the latter, and how they are changing.0
824514281002020-02-052020-10-13BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 486720:554Alasdair MacDhòmhnaill (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Alasdair MacDonald (Alasdair Crois Mòraig) from North Uist talks about his life-time commitment to crofting, which his son is now continuing. His first schooling was in Carinish, with his fondest memory being of getting out into the garden, followed by Bayhead, and one year in Inverness, which he didn’t like. On returning to Uist he has worked his croft full-time ever since. He recalls the house-visiting customs of earlier times. His wife, Annie, is from Broughty Ferry, but Alasdair would find it difficult to live somewhere else if it wasn’t by the sea. He’s seen many changes since the time crofters would work with horses, and he explains fertilising and storage practices using seaweed and potatoes.0
8246115432020-02-052020-10-13BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 527623:364Alasdair MacDhòmhnaill (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Alasdair remarks on developments since the 60s, such as the advent of tractors for horses, the Baleshare causeway, local government reorganisation, and European Union development funds. He also talks about a visit to New Zealand and the evident Gaelic influence in its recent history. The discussion shifts to discussion of changes in the Uist physical environment. Shipwrecks are also talked about and the cargo they might yield. Alasdair explains the history of the name Crois Mòraig, and talks about the strength of Gaelic in the community, and reflects on the rhythm of the seasons experienced through crofting.1
82471231882020-02-052020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 756137:524Aonghas MacPhàil (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Angus MacPhail, from Carinish in North Uist, reveals his Boreray ancestry, and talks about his schooling in both North and South Uist before finishing in Inverness, with impressions of hostel life and being regarded as a “teuchter” in the town. Studying Civil Engineering in Aberdeen, he shared lodgings with other islanders, and was involved in inter-university competitions in shinty and through the pipe-band. Work took him to Inverawe first, followed by London (where he met his Irish wife), and then back to Scotland. Always keeping in touch with fellow Gaels, when they moved to Loch Broom they got involved with An Comunn Gàidhealach, and he also volunteered with the Mountain Rescue team.0
8248112852020-02-052020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 680834:104Aonghas MacPhàil (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Angus talks about their life for 7 years around Applecross and the north-west, with his wife being a district nurse and also doing B&B, in an area where there was still some Gaelic spoken. They then moved back to Uist (via Lewis) when Comhairle nan Eilean Siar was formed. This was a busy time with lots of civil engineering work on roads and new developments. He talks about the development of the strong local Gaelic drama group, and plans for the local history society. Other interests include boating, and his garden – though this was mainly his wife’s work. He discusses the changes he’s seen in Carinish, and his international links through family in Australia and Ireland.0
447620271172016-07-292016-08-05BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 23815:353Birlinn Chlann Raghnaill: Alan and Bill at KildonanAlan Riach and Bill Innes gave a unique bilingual rendition of the famous poem by Alasdair Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair at Kildonan Museum in South Uist. Alan presented extracts from his new English version, which were interspersed with Gaelic readings from the original by Bill. The video clip shows the final part of their performance. Only the Gaelic sections are transcribed here.0
823313432842020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 599227:084Catrìona Nic an t-Saoir (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Catrìona, from Iochdar in South Uist, recalls happy schooldays, first in Iochdar, then Daliburgh, and finishing in Fort William on the mainland. Having decided on a teaching career she trained in Glasgow, before returning to South Uist for her first job, in Lochboisdale, where she used her Gaelic quite a lot. On marrying she moved back to Fort William where she worked in a school for twenty years, while remarking on the close island and Gaelic connections of many in the town and the school.0
82351216602020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 642330:124Catrìona Nic an t-Saoir (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute, with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Catrìona talks about her seminal involvement in the development of Gaelic Medium Education in Lochaber and neighbouring areas, together with the growth of the Fèis movement at the same time. She enjoyed her peripatetic lifestyle. On retiring home to South Uist, she was involved in supply teaching, and has become closely involved with Ceòlas, the summer school and associated activities, and been involved in teaching Gaelic to adults, for example, for Sabhal Mòr Ostaig.0
843414665322020-03-122020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 510422:344Christine Primrose (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Christine Primrose first recalls her early childhood in Carloway, Lewis – a close community in which every house had a loom. She started school very young, but always remembers singing – whether to neighbours in their homes, or at community concerts when still a young girl. She talks about the pressure of performance and how to look after your voice. Choral singing is also discussed. Her early career through school, college, and work in Glasgow was marked by singing, culminating with the prize for “seann nòs” (a term which she questions) at the Mòd.1
84351236732020-03-122020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 662630:264Christine Primrose (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Christine talks about touring Ireland and the novel experience of presenting her songs outside her community, emphasising the importance of feeling to maintain authenticity. She is disciplined in her approach, while also bringing her own interpretation to a song. Care for the rhythm of the words enhances the story. Moving to Sabhal Mòr Ostaig enabled her to maintain her singing career, while helping to promote the Gaelic college. She enjoys teaching, and listening to singers from other traditions. She stresses the importance of giving young performers time to learn their craft before pressurising them to perform. Return visits to Carloway underline for her the importance of acknowledging change.1
82491203422020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 377429:544Dòmhnall MacDhòmhnaill (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Donald MacDonald, from Baleshare, North Uist, recalls his schooling and first job. Going to primary school in Baleshare he found he made faster progress with a Gaelic-speaking teacher. Illness interrupted his education at Bayhead, before he spent 5 years in Inverness, where he encountered some hostility as a “teuchter”, and experienced a distancing from his family. A happier memory was of salmon poaching in Lewis on his way home, where he started work in a bank before being transferred to Glasgow.0
8250114932020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 445235:564Dòmhnall MacDhòmhnaill (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Donald recalls giving up his job in Glasgow, and then poignantly describes how his father saw him off at the quay in Lochmaddy as he set off on his travels round Europe. He recounts various adventures with various travelling companions, before arriving in Turkey. Troubles at the time between Turkey and Greece over Cyprus caused difficulties with the post.0
8251116632020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 525835:434Dòmhnall MacDhòmhnaill (3)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the third part, Donald describes his adventures crossing to the West Bank from Syria to spend time in a kibbutz. He was then called home in light of his father’s serious illness, which meant that Donald had take over responsibility for the croftwork. Working several crofts together he made a living for a while selling cattle and beef, with partners in Elgin and customers in Ardnamurchan. While his father was alive they would also host Gaelic learners. Following a mini-stroke he no longer keeps cattle, but a neighbour continues to use his land.0
762816513192019-07-302020-02-05BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 518126:384Eairdsidh CaimbeulAn early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. This film was made in an initial training session. As part of their training Pàdruig quizzes Archie on his recollections and opinions on growing up and continuing to live on Benbecula. Archie is a native of Benbecula, and the conversation starts with him explaining his family roots. He goes on to talk about his schooling and higher education on the islands and later on the mainland. The conversation moves on to his history of employment, with spells in Gaelic playgroup development and then in advice work back on Benbecula. Pàdruig then asks Archie about changes he’s witnessed in the locality and the language since the days of his youth.1
824012831092020-02-052020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 707330:414Gina NicDhòmhnaill (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Gina MacDonald from Claddach Baleshare in North Uist remembers her early schooldays, and a childhood in the Westford Inn. She talks about the prevalence of Gaelic and the difference in English skills between the generations. She completed her schooling in Inverness, and worked in Glasgow for a while before returning to Uist to work in a bank. Then, after retiring from that work, she returned to education to do a BA in Art, and she discusses some of the challenges entailed.0
82411192192020-02-052020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 624429:294Gina NicDhòmhnaill (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Gina first shows Archie some of her work from her art course, discussing local environmental and cultural influences and their interaction with memory processes. This leads on to discussing local storytelling experiences. Gina further explains how the family croft has developed, with the associated self-catering accommodation business for returning visitors, and expresses an interest in continuing to work with the active local history society.0
791515308332019-11-072020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 491722:594Hughena NicDhòmhnaill (1)An early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first of two parts, Hughena talks about her family background and her happy memories of growing up and going to various schools in Uist and Benbecula, including her experience of coming across computers for the first time when Sgoil Lìonacleit opened. This was followed by a spell in Stornoway where she studied at the college and did part-time work, including with Radio nan Gàidheal. On returning to Uist she worked in various places, and raised a family. She describes how she enjoys working with people, and how she likes to relax afterwards.0
79161206402019-11-072020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 479921:504Hughena NicDhòmhnaill (2)An early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers. Here, in the second of two parts, discussion of the importance of Hughena’s faith to her leads onto broader reminiscence over customs and traditions in the days of her childhood, when casual visits to and from neighbours would be more frequent, often related to crofting matters. Hughena describes early memories of collecting and eating shellfish from the shore, and of baking skills less often put to use these days now that so much is so easily available in the shops. The conversation finishes with some discussion of the strength of Gaelic use in her family, how she’s passed it on successfully to her children, and the value of now encouraging older community members to share their spoken skills, while acknowledging the challenges involved in recording them.0
84321244522020-03-122020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 471521:234Iain Greumach (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Iain Graham talks about his family background and his earliest memories of life in Back, on Lewis, where he grew up in a close-knit community. He describes his early education in the local school and how that was followed up by a spell at the Nicolson Institute in Stornoway. He also talks about the typical occupations in the community at the time, where many people were involved in weaving, and about Hallowe’en practices. He continued his education in Aberdeen, before being recruited to Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, the Gaelic college on Skye.0
8433112372020-03-122020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 448022:174Iain Greumach (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Iain recalls initially what Sabhal Mòr Ostaig was like when he first joined. He has seen many developments, not just in the estate, but also in the range of courses that have been developed over time. While the first students tended to come from the islands, the student body has changed, with greater geographical mixing and of ages. Course delivery methods have also become more flexible. Iain is closely involved with organising work experience for students, and is pleased that college graduates find good employment. Finally, he reflects on both change and continuity as he experiences it on frequent return visits to Lewis.0
9169126352021-02-112021-02-11BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 497525:194Magaidh Smith (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Maggie Smith, from Achmore on Lewis, talks about early childhood memories and stories of Glasgow where she was born, though she has Achmore roots going back many generations. Returning home she recalls the kind of upbringing island children of her age received, in which community links and mutual responsibilities were strong. Grandparental stories from work experience in Patagonia, and snatches of Spanish at the fank guarded against cultural introversion. She recalls her schooling, and the impact of television’s arrival on cèilidh culture, with traditional work on the land noticeably falling off in the 80s, particularly after oil work began.0
917093182021-02-112021-02-11BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 385719:184Maggie Smith (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part Maggie and Peter talk about trends in island work patterns over the years. The advent of the Arnish yard led to skills development opportunities for men across Lewis, which many later put to use in openings around the world. Weaving was a traditional occupation, frequently practised in combination with other jobs. Even as a schoolchild Maggie was accustomed to fitting her schoolwork into other duties, such as fetching water for the house. After a short spell working in Inverness after school she returned to work with the family haulage firm for many years, before branching out into media work, tourism and other projects.0
917199362021-02-112021-02-11BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 5879334Maggie Smith (3)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the third part Maggie talks more about her cultural activity in the community, including community drama based on locally sourced stories, and the collection of local poetry. Moving to Zoom during lockdown has created a new platform for locals to share stories and for incomers and Gaelic learners to learn about the culture, recreating old communities and gathering new people. She also talks about the power of music and song in working with older people at risk of memory loss, and of collecting fishermen’s stories, mostly in Gaelic. The conversation ends with a discussion of changes that have come over Achmore and the use of Gaelic in the community.1
825212211022020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 551524:184Màiri Robasdan (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Mary Robertson from Benbecula, talks about her family and her memories of her early schooldays in Torlum. Her father was a gamekeeper for the South Uist estate. Leaving at 15 to get further training at Duncraig Castle was a shock. She describes the daily routine there. After that she worked in Edinburgh for two years before moving to Fort William to do hotel work, where she found more of an island community.0
82531210272020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 604626:474Màiri Robasdan (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Mary describes returning to Benbecula after her husband’s death, and the changes she noticed, particularly with the increased army presence and the work available through public schemes. She found work in the newly opened Sgoil Lìonacleit, where she continued till retirement. She is also involved with various charities and community groups, and her church involvement has entailed trips abroad to various countries. Her Gaelic interest also took her to Canada. She still dances and enjoys walking in various parts of the Highlands.0
451427418372016-10-112019-03-19BY-NC-NDGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 666852:254Norman Maclean on Friday: GàidhligOn the last day, Norman is invited to turn his thoughts specifically to Gaelic and its place in people’s hearts and minds, and to Gaelic development efforts. Acknowledging the challenges the language faces in today’s world, he reflects on the complex interplay and relationships between Gaelic and English, and on various ways in which bilingualism can be viewed. In emphasising its benefits he counsels against the dangers of a monolingual “English ghetto”, colourfully invoking his own observations on the nomination campaign for the American presidential election. In contemplating bi-directional bilingualism he discusses the challenges of, and offers his own advice on, the learning of Gaelic and, in particular, the place of literacy. Finally, he relates the language issue back to the culture from which it springs, sharing personal thoughts on how his sense of belonging reinforces his sense of identity, and emphasising his own willingness and commitment to pass on his knowledge to others.0
4510279311732016-10-112016-11-11BY-NC-NDGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 489638:334Norman Maclean on Monday: Sinnsireachd“Every Gael knows who he is.” Norman talks about his genealogy, on both sides of the family, and how these family networks played an important part in his early upbringing in Glasgow, Lochaber, and Benbecula. He has clear memories of his paternal grandfather teaching him songs, a man who himself won a prize for Gaelic singing at the Falkirk Tryst of 1878. His maternal grandmother, meanwhile, migrated to Glasgow from North Uist and never learned to speak English, functioning socially just within the Gaelic-speaking community of Glasgow of that time. Norman reflects on how community relations were experienced from different perspectives in his childhood.0
451322485432016-10-112016-11-11BY-NC-NDGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 566844:214Norman Maclean on Thursday: CruthachalachdNorman is invited to discuss his personal creativity as a teacher, writer, poet, musician, and comedian. He reflects on the varied influences of others, from backstreet singers to Billy Connolly, and discusses figures and trends in various art forms, and offers his opinions. He also recites a recently composed example of his own poetry, and other verses that have impressed him. In discussing how his bilingual background contributed to shaping his material, he also reflects on how commentators’ propensity to place performers in pigeonholing categories could result in narrow or distorting descriptions of his work, for example as a “Gaelic comedian”.0
451122399482016-10-112016-11-11BY-NC-NDGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 467435:134Norman Maclean on Tuesday: FoghlamAfter offering some further thoughts on the dominant Catholic-Protestant divide in the Glasgow of his youth, Norman goes on to trace his educational journey, with customary vivid detail and illustrative anecdote, through primary schools in Lochaber, Benbecula and Glasgow, and on to Belahouston Academy and Glasgow University. He discusses the constraints on, and the opportunities for, varied language choices he and others made in these contexts, within and outwith home and school environments, reflecting also on the Gàidheal-Gall relationship in Glasgow, and some of the wider educational choices he made at that time.0
451223175752016-10-112016-11-11BY-NC-NDGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 696853:484Norman Maclean on Wednesday: CoimhearsnachdanNorman describes and reflects upon changes he has witnessed in Gaelic community life over the years, both in Glasgow and in the Hebrides, highlighting some paradoxes and tensions. In former times geographical horizons may have been much closer in comparison with the global awareness modern connectivity enables, yet the latter may not lead to a sense of greater connectedness. He discusses how, while the Gaelic community in Glasgow may have tended to envisage itself in a higher or somewhat exclusive position in relation to other Glaswegians, there was nonetheless a strongly felt imperative to acquire their language. Conversely, while young Gaels might be envied by their peers in some ways, they did not feel their language was respected by non-speakers, with apparent racial imprecations sometimes experienced. Lastly, in discussing how broadly the term “Gàidhealach” might be applied, he depicts in more detail the links and fissures between Glasgow communities of Irish and Scottish Island/Highland extraction.0
768916178822019-09-032020-06-02BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 480326:354Pàdruig MoireachAn early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. This film was made in an initial training session. As part of their training Archie quizzes Pàdruig on his lifestory. Pàdruig establishes his family roots in Carloway, Lewis, and talks about his early memories of home and community life there as a child. He goes on to describe his progress through school on Lewis and higher education in Aberdeen, leading to work on the North Sea rigs. This was followed by a career change into language teaching which him took him abroad before returning to Scotland and involvement in teaching Gaelic to adults. The conversation concludes with a discussion of some of the pleasures and challenges entailed in this area of work.0
82361178182020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 688026:074Seonag Smith (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Seonag Smith from Hàclait talks about her early years in Benbecula, including schooling in Daliburgh and Iochdar. She recalls family life as the eldest child, including helping on the croft, boat trips, and social practices associated with peatcutting, such as family division of labour and attention to the needs of elderly neighbours. She also talks about army-community relations once she started working at the “camp” after leaving school.0
82371107502020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 762731:324Seonag Smith (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Seonag talks about the social scene in Benbecula when she was young, and how she met her husband. She also talks about her work on St Kilda, and her impressions of that island. Army life took them to Germany, and she mentions how she felt knowing Gaelic helped her learn German. This was followed by spells in Catterick, and London, where she had the chance to observe a different world at close hand. Eventually they returned to Benbecula to a newly built house.0
8238108592020-02-052020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 854534:374Seonag Smith (3)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the third part, Seonag talks about her pastimes, such as reading, and her regular appearances on Gaelic radio and TV (and the prizes she’s won) and reflects on current Gaelic employment opportunities. She also recalls her parent’s stories of older feasting traditions attendant on weddings and sales days. Acknowledging the facilities now available at the 6-year school, and through online services, she regrets the lack of job opportunities for young people. Returning to cooking, the conversation ends with a discussion of traditional seafoods.0
838812941152020-02-272020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 606129:594Seònaid Mhoireach (1)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first part, Jessie Murray, originally from Shawbost, Lewis, talks to her son Peter about their family history, and how his grandparents actually met and married around the time of the Depression in Detroit, where there was a strong Gaelic community. She tells stories of jumping ship, and working conditions and how they differed in America. On returning to Lewis they raised a family on the croft, and Jessie talks of her earliest memories of life on the land, herding the cows and getting home-made butter and cheese, and the food she got at school before they opened a canteen.0
838911141082020-02-272020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 667133:344Seònaid Mhoireach (2)Part of the Stòras Beò nan Gàidheal project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, record the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part, Jessie recalls her schooling and the weak Gaelic component to it, though the language was strong in the playground and the community. Communion practices are also recalled, as well as the role of supernatural tales, and New Year and Hallowe’en customs in a culture where house visits were common. After leaving school at 16 and some work experience Jessie settled on training for nursing, which took her to Glasgow. Plans to move to Canada were abandoned when she met Peter’s father, and they returned to Lewis, first to Carloway, then Stornoway. Now living in Inverness, she offers thoughts on changes she’s seen in Lewis and the lack of opportunities. She prefers to remember home as it was.0
785314822462019-10-122020-05-25BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 458829:544Tòmas MacDhòmhnaill (1)An early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the first of two parts, Tommy Macdonald talks to Archie Campbell about his life in South Uist. Tommy talks about his family antecedents and also about his employment history, starting with helping in his father’s mobile shop, followed by a long spell with a fish farm company during which time he developed his computing skills and interests. This was followed by a diversification into a number of different paths, including providing local information on visiting bus tours. Local genealogical research led him to an interesting discovery about his own family history.0
78541148132019-10-122020-06-01BY-NC-SAGuthanNanEileanGàidhligC2 501732:104Tòmas MacDhòmhnaill (2)An early sample from a pilot project in which the UHI Language Sciences Institute with Sabhal Mòr Ostaig and Soillse, together with Irish partners, embark on recording the natural speech of Irish and Scottish Gaelic speakers in their own communities with user-friendly equipment and techniques. Here, in the second part Tommy talks about his involvement with various local cultural groups in South Uist, such as Ceòlas, Fèir Tir a’ Mhurain, and the Accordion and Fiddle club. He and Archie also discuss some of the challenges and opportunities of working with and in Gaelic in the community today in and between the various generations. The modern disappearance of the “taigh ceilidh” stimulates the recollection and brief retelling of some of the stories that would be told in earlier times.0
154724202362013-12-142013-12-15BY-SAcaoimhinsmoGàidhligC2+214 6:32Salm 122, na h-earrainn 6-9, Dòmhnall MacLeòidSalm 122, na h-earrainn 6-9. Dòmhnall MacLeòid (Port Rìgh agus Sgalpaigh)0

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